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Josef Albers
Formulation: Articulation, Folio I / Folder 8, 1972
screenprint
sheet: 15 x 20 in. (38.1 x 50.8 cm)
1976.4.245.8

2015 Weil am Rhein + Bonn + Brussels + Lausanne + Copenhagen

Das Bauhaus #allesistdesign is a major exhibition presenting a comprehensive overview of the Bauhaus concept of design. The Bauhaus was one of the most influential cultural institutions of the twentieth century, a place where the leading tendencies of the European avant-garde converged and melded. Stylized into a myth, the Bauhaus also came to epitomize the modern design cliché: geometric, industrial, cool. Das Bauhaus #allesistdesign presents a multiplicity of rare, in some cases never-before-seen works from the fields of design, architecture, art, film, and photography, and documents underlying developmental processes and societal models. At the same time, the exhibition considers the influence of the Bauhaus as it relates to current developments in design, such as the digital revolution, and features works by contemporary designers and artists. Viewed from this present-day perspective, the Bauhaus reveals an array of new facets with surprising contemporary relevance. Featured designers and artists include Josef and Anni Albers, Marianne Brandt, Marcel Breuer, Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, Lyonel Feininger, Joseph Grima, Walter Gropius, Enzo Mari, Olaf Nicolai, Open Desk, Adrian Sauer, Oskar Schlemmer, among many others.

Josef Albers
Tlaloc, 1944
woodcut in rough pine board
15 x 14 1/2 in. (38.1 x 36.8 cm)
1976.4.118
Josef Albers
Tenayuca, 1942
oil on masonite
8 1/2 x 12 in. (21.6 x 30.5 cm)
1976.1.1099

2018 Sao Paulo + Berlin + Bern

Bauhaus Imaginista is an international project commemorating the centenary of the foundation of the German design school. Bauhaus Imaginista comprises international exhibitions and debates, designed and developed by the Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and Media (BKM) of Germany, Bauhaus Association, and Goethe Institut, in partnership with several institutions. At Sesc Pompeia, the exhibition presents archival documents, publications, objects, and works of art related to Bauhaus teachers, students, and artists. In addition, the exhibition features artists from outside Germany who were directly influenced by the Bauhaus.

Josef Albers
Oscillating (C), 1940-45
oil on masonite
27 x 24 in. (68.6 x 61 cm)
1976.1.1367
Josef Albers
Untitled (Maya Temple, Chichen Itza, Mexico), ca. 1940
gelatin silver print
sheet: 5 1/8 x 6 15/16 in. (13 x 17.6 cm)
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Josef Albers
Untitled, ca. 1940
oil on blotting paper
16 1/2 x 28 in. (41.9 x 71.1 cm)
1976.2.254
Josef Albers
Color study for a Variant/Adobe, 1947
oil on blotting paper
19 x 24 1/8 in. (48.3 x 61.4 cm)
1976.2.247
Installation view, Josef Albers in Mexico, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 2017. Photo: David Heald
Installation view, Josef Albers in Mexico, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 2017. Photo: David Heald
Installation view, Josef Albers in Mexico, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 2017. Photo: David Heald
Installation view, Josef Albers in Mexico, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 2017. Photo: David Heald
Installation view, Josef Albers in Mexico, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 2017. Photo: David Heald

2017 New York + Venice + Phoenix

Josef Albers in Mexico brings together the artist's photographs and photo collages from the Guggenheim's collection and various lenders. These works, many of which have never been exhibited publicly, suggest a nuanced relationship between the forms and motifs of pre-Columbian monuments and the artist's iconic abstract canvases.

Albers's innovative approach to photography remains an underappreciated aspect of his career. On his first trip to Mexico, in 1935, Albers encountered the magnificent architecture of ancient Mesoamerica. He later remarked in a letter to Vasily Kandinsky, a former colleague at the Bauhaus, "Mexico is truly the promised land of abstract art." With his wife, artist Anni Albers, Josef visited Mexico and other Latin American countries nearly a dozen times from 1935 to 1967. They saw numerous archeological sites and monuments, especially in Mexico and Peru. On each visit, Josef took hundreds of black-and-white photographs of the pyramids, shrines, and sanctuaries at these sites, often grouping multiple images printed at various scales onto eight by ten inch sheets.

Albers's experiences in Latin America offer an essential context for understanding his paintings and prints, particularly from his Homage to the Square and Variant/Adobe series, examples of which are featured in this show.

Anni Albers
Wallhanging, 1925
silk, cotton, and acetate
57 x 36 1/8 in. (145 x 92 cm)
Die Neue Sammlung, Munich

2019 Munich

Reflex Bauhaus. 40 Objects–5 Conversations marks the hundredth anniversary of the Bauhaus, featuring important Bauhaus objects in dialog with contemporary art. In 1925, the year Die Neue Sammlung was established, the Bauhaus left Weimar for Dessau. Die Neue Sammlung was one of the first museums to acquire contemporary Bauhaus works that are today considered icons of modern design. Pieces from this period include textiles by Anni Albers and Gunta Stölzl, toys by Alma Buscher and Ludwig Hirschfeld-Mack, and works in metal by Otto Rittweger and Wilhelm Wagenfeld. Further acquisitions were made until recently, adding important works to the collection of historical objects, many of which are on view for first time.

Anni Albers
Bedspread for Harvard Graduate Center, 1949
cotton
100 x 55 7/8 in. (254 x 141.8 cm)
Harvard Art Museums/Busch-Reisinger Museum, Gift of Anni Albers
Anni Albers
Design for a Silk Tapestry, 1926
transparent and opaque watercolor over graphite on paper
sheet: 18 7/8 x 12 1/2 in. (47.8 x 31.7 cm)
Harvard Art Museums/Busch-Reisinger Museum, Gift of Anni Albers
Anni Albers
Monte Alban, 1936
silk, linen, wool
57 1/2 x 44 1/8 in. (146 x 112 cm)
Harvard Art Museums/Busch-Reisinger Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Richard G. Leahy
Josef Albers
Tea Glass Holder, 1926
chrome-plated steel and ebony
5 1/4 in. (13.3 cm)
Harvard Art Museums/Busch-Reisinger Museum, Gift of Walter Gropius

2019 Cambridge, Massachusetts

The Bauhaus and Harvard presented in conjunction with the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany, features nearly 200 works by 74 artists, drawn almost entirely from the Busch-Reisinger Museum's extensive Bauhaus collection. Founded in 1919 and closed just fourteen years later, the Bauhaus was the twentieth century's most influential school of art, architecture, and design. Harvard University played host to the first Bauhaus exhibition in the United States in 1930, and went on to become an unofficial center for the Bauhaus in America when founding director Walter Gropius joined Harvard's department of architecture in 1937. Today the Busch-Reisinger Museum houses the largest Bauhaus collection outside Germany, initiated and assembled through the efforts of Gropius and many former teachers and students who emigrated from Nazi Germany, including Anni and Josef Albers, Herbert Bayer, Lyonel Feininger, and László Moholy-Nagy.

The exhibition features rarely seen student exercises, iconic design objects, photography, textiles, typography, paintings, and archival materials. It explores the school's pioneering approach to art education, the ways its workshops sought to revolutionize the experience of everyday life, the widespread influence of Bauhaus instruction in America, and Harvard's own Graduate Center.

Josef Albers
Self Portrait, 1917
transfer lithograph
sheet: 19 5/8 x 13 3/4 in. (49.7 x 35 cm)

2019 Boston

Radical Geometries marks the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Bauhaus with a group of more than 60 works on paper—primarily prints in addition to drawings, photographs, and postcards designed by faculty and students for the first Bauhaus exhibition at Weimar in 1923. The objects on display are drawn from the museum's collection along with key loans from private collections. Featured artists include Josef Albers, László Moholy-Nagy, Lyonel Feininger, Wassily Kandinsky, and Paul Klee, among others.

Josef Albers
Fabrik (Factory), 1925
sandblasted flashed glass with black paint
11 x 14 in. (27.9 × 35.6 cm)
1976.6.4
Josef Albers
Park, ca. 1923
glass, metal, wire, and paint
19 1/2 × 15 in. (49.5 × 38.1 cm)
1992.6.28
Josef Albers
Study for Rosa Mystica Ora Pr[o] Nobis, ca. 1917-18
gouache on paper
23 5/8 x 11 7/8 in. (60 x 30 cm)
2011.2.1
Installation view, Bauhaus Nederland, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, 2019. Photo: Lotte Stekelenburg

2019 Rotterdam

Bauhaus Nederland considers the influence of the Bauhaus in the Netherlands as well as the reciprocal influence of Dutch art and architecture on the development of the Bauhaus. In the interwar years, Rotterdam was the Dutch city in which modernism was most prominently expressed in architecture and design. For this exhibition, the museum's collection is augmented with loans from other collections at home and abroad. The two-way inspiration between the Netherlands and the Bauhaus is illustrated through artworks, furniture, ceramics, textiles, industrial design, photography, typography and architecture. The exhibition begins at the turn of the twentieth century and continues through 1968, featuring 200 works from three main Bauhaus periods. 2019 marks the centenary of the founding of the Bauhaus, the innovative German art and design school which ran from 1919 to 1933.

Josef Albers
Formulation: Articulation, Folio II / Folder 5, 1972
screenprint
sheet: 15 x 20 in. (38.1 x 50.8 cm)

2019 Montgomery, Alabama

Josef Albers/Donald Judd, Thematic Variations explores the work of these two artists, and specifically their approaches to color and form. In his landmark series, Homage to a Square, 1962, and later in the portfolio Formulation: Articulation, 1972, among other works, Josef Albers investigated color interactions and how the human eye processes the shifting characteristics of color when placed in various configurations. Similarly, Judd proposed that art could be logical, direct, and unemotional. He wrote, "A shape, a volume, a color, a surface is something itself. It shouldn't be concealed as part of a fairly different whole." His austere and reductive forms are neutral, avoiding any symbolic associations.

Anni Albers
City, 1949
linen and cotton
17 1/2 × 26 1/2 in. (44.4 × 67.3 cm)
2003.12.1
Installation view, Paul Klee and Anni Albers, San Francisco Museum of Art, 2019. © 2019 San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Katherine du Tiel
Installation view, Paul Klee and Anni Albers, San Francisco Museum of Art, 2019. © 2019 San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Katherine du Tiel

2019 San Francisco

Paul Klee and Anni Albers explores linear and geometric constructions by both artists across a range of media—including weaving, painting, and drawing—in which line and the pliable plane are paramount. Under the tutelage of Bauhaus master Paul Klee, Anni Albers elevated the ancient art of weaving into a bold and vibrant Modernist art form.

Anni Albers
Black White Gray, 1927/1964
cotton and silk
58 1/4 × 47 3/4 in. (148 x 121.3 cm)

2019 Nürnberg, Germany

Bau [spiel] haus features more than 100 works from over 100 years, celebrating the legacy of the Bauhaus era (1919–39) and the concepts of play and playfulness, a time-tested approach that was specific to the Bauhaus. Bauhaus masters like Walter Gropius and Johannes Itten already recognized the far-reaching social and artistic potential of play—at a time when something new had to be made out of the ruins of the old world. They made play the basis of their interdisciplinary preliminary courses, and the idea of combining work and play manifested in Itten's inaugural lecture of 1919 came to shape the Bauhaus program. The school used the human urge to play as an engine to drive development and design. Neues Museum examines this tradition and traces the way the Bauhaus legacy is being passed on via the present to the future.

Josef Albers
Homage to the Square: White Setting, 1959
oil on masonite
36 x 36 in. (91.5 x 91.5 cm)
Toledo Museum of Art

2019 Toledo, Ohio

"Everything Is Rhythm": Mid-Century Art and Music is a multisensory display focused on the relationship between art and music. The exhibition features a selection of twentieth-century abstract paintings paired with carefully curated musical compositions. Presented together in this manner, the art and music engage visitors in an experience that engenders close looking, contemplation, and a consideration of the connection between the two forms.

Josef Albers
I-S LXX a, 1970
screenprint
21 x 21 in. (53.3 x 53.3 cm)

2019 New York

Josef Albers and Robert Mangold: The Essence of Form is a survey of selected prints presenting the artists' work in dialogue. The exhibition includes examples of Albers's early monochromatic woodcuts and lithographs from the 1940s and selected Homage to the Square screenprints from his iconic series. Among Robert Mangold's works on view are early "x" and "+" screenprints dating from 1981, the elongated rectangles of the Frame series from the mid 1980s, and examples in aquatint and woodcut from his architectonic Column series.

Josef Albers
Formulation: Articulation, Folio II / Folder 13, 1972
screenprint
sheet: 15 x 20 in. (38.1 x 50.8 cm)

2019 Tucson, Arizona

Learning to See: Josef Albers features Albers's portfolio of screenprints Formulation: Articulation. Completed in 1972 the portfolio was published by Harry N. Abrams and printed by the well-known fine art printing firm Ives-Sillman. The series includes screenprints based on works from forty years of Albers's career.

Installation view, Josef Albers and Fred Sandback, Krakow Witkin Gallery, Boston, 2019. Photo courtesy of Krakow Witkin Gallery

2019 Boston

Josef Albers and Fred Sandback features the work of these two artists.

2019 Hong Kong

A Luta Continua is an exhibition of the Sylvio Perlstein Collection. Over the course of more than five decades, Perlstein has assembled an intensely personal collection rooted in a passion for the work of groundbreaking artists. The Collection traces the course of twentieth-century art, from Dada and Surrealism to Abstraction, Land Art, Conceptual Art, Minimal Art, Pop Art, Op Art, Arte Povera, Nouveau Réalisme, and Contemporary Art. But above all, A Luta Continua testifies to the power of connoisseurship and collecting as a talent, an art in itself. The exhibition focuses on four main pillars of the Perlstein collection: Dada and Surrealism, vintage photography from the twentieth-century, Minimalism, and a compilation of contemporary artists Perlstein is deeply passionate about. There are around 200 works on view by some 112 artists. Among these are Josef Albers, Carl Andre, Diane Arbus, Hans Bellmer, André Breton, Marcel Broodthaers, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Hannah Höch, Jenny Holzer, Donald Judd, Sol LeWitt, René Magritte, Man Ray, Bruce Nauman, Brice Marden, Robert Morris, Edward Ruscha, Robert Ryman, Fred Sandback, and Andy Warhol.