Info Images Caption LEFT RIGHT 1 | 0
Info Images Caption LEFT RIGHT 1 | 0
Info Images Caption LEFT RIGHT 1 | 0
Info Images Caption LEFT RIGHT 1 | 0
Info Images Caption LEFT RIGHT 1 | 0
Info Images Caption
Info Images Caption
Info Images Caption LEFT RIGHT 1 | 0
Info Images Caption LEFT RIGHT 1 | 0
Anni Albers
Design for a 1926 unexecuted wallhanging, n.d.
gouache with pencil on photo offset paper
15 x 9 3/4 in. (38.1 x 24.7 cm)
1994.10.1
Anni Albers
With Verticals, 1946
cotton and linen
61 × 46.5 in. (154.9 × 118.1 cm)
2004.12.1
Anni Albers
Red and Blue Layers, 1954
cotton
24 1/4 × 14 3/4 in. (61.6 × 37.8 cm)
1998.12.1
Anni Albers
Knot, 1947
gouache on paper
17 × 20 in. (43.2 × 51 cm)
1994.10.3

2018 Düsseldorf + London

Anni Albers is a full-scale retrospective bringing together the most important examples of her work, from beautiful small-scale creations to wall hangings. The exhibition further explores the textiles Albers designed for mass-production and her use of new technologies and synthetic fibers. As a student at the radical and ostensibly egalitarian Bauhaus art school, Anni Albers, like other women, was barred from becoming a painter. Instead she enrolled in the weaving workshop and made textiles her means of expression. Albers rose to become an influential figure, exploring the technical limits of hand-weaving to pioneer innovative uses of woven fabric as art, architecture, and design.

Josef Albers
Variant VI, 1966
from the portfolio Ten Variants
screenprint
sheet: 17 x 17 in. (43.2 x 43.2 cm)
Whitney Museum of American Art
Josef Albers
Homage to the Square I, 1967
from the portfolio Homage to the Square
screenprint
sheet: 24 3/16 × 24 3/16 in. (61.4 × 61.4 cm)
Whitney Museum of American Art

2018 New York

Programmed: Rules, Codes, and Choreographies in Art, 1965–2018 establishes connections between works of art based on instructions, spanning over fifty years of conceptual, video, and computational art. The pieces in the exhibition are all "programmed" using instructions, sets of rules, and code, but they also address the use of programming in their creation. The exhibition links two strands of artistic exploration: the first examines the program as instructions, rules, and algorithms with a focus on conceptual art practices and their emphasis on ideas as the driving force behind the art; the second strand engages with the use of instructions and algorithms to manipulate the TV program, its apparatus, and signals or image sequences. Featuring works drawn from the Whitney's collection, Programmed looks back at predecessors of computational art and shows how the ideas addressed in those earlier works have evolved in contemporary artistic practices. At a time when our world is increasingly driven by automated systems, Programmed traces how rules and instructions in art have both responded to and been shaped by technologies, resulting in profound changes to our image culture.

Anni Albers
TR III, 1970
screenprint
sheet: 16 1/2 x 18 1/2 in. (42 x 47 cm)
1994.11.21
Anni Albers
GR I, 1970
screenprint
sheet: 29 x 24 in. (73.6 x 60.9 cm)
1994.11.18
Josef Albers
Variant IX, 1967
screenprint
sheet: 17 x 17 in. (43.2 x 43.2 cm)
1976.4.173.9

2018 Old Lyme, Connecticut

Paper Trail: American Prints, Drawings, and Watercolors draws from the museum's collection and features significant works by Connecticut artists from colonial times to the present. Works on paper have been cherished in Old Lyme since the art colony's heyday, when artists gathered around Florence Griswold's parlor table to play the "Wiggle Game"—an amusement where one artist was challenged to finish a drawing of disparate lines begun by another. The museum's collection has grown in scope to include works on paper by Josef and Anni Albers, Fidelia Bridges, Thomas Nason, and Sol LeWitt, among many others.

Josef Albers
Tlaloc, 1944
woodcut in rough pine board
15 x 14 1/2 in. (38.1 x 36.8 cm)
1976.4.118
Josef Albers
Tenayuca, 1942
oil on masonite
8 1/2 x 12 in. (21.6 x 30.5 cm)
1976.1.1099

2018 Sao Paulo + Berlin + Bern

Bauhaus Imaginista is an international project commemorating the centenary of the foundation of the German design school. Bauhaus Imaginista comprises international exhibitions and debates, designed and developed by the Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and Media (BKM) of Germany, Bauhaus Association, and Goethe Institut, in partnership with several institutions. At Sesc Pompeia, the exhibition presents archival documents, publications, objects, and works of art related to Bauhaus teachers, students, and artists. In addition, the exhibition features artists from outside Germany who were directly influenced by the Bauhaus.

Josef Albers
Variant of Related, n.d.
oil on masonite
16 x 13 in. (40.6 x 33 cm)
1976.1.1052
Anni Albers
Study for DO II, 1973
gouache on blueprint paper
18 1/4 × 18 1/2 in. (46.3 × 47 cm)
1994.10.44

2018 Münster

Bauhaus and America: Experiments in Light and Motion is being presented on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the Bauhaus. Based on the importance of the Bauhaus—and in particular the Bauhaus stage as an interdisciplinary laboratory for experiments in light and movement—the artistic debates of former Bauhaus members and Americans are examined for the first time with light and movement, including light and kinetic art, experimental film, dance, and performance. The exhibition also features works by European artists from the 1950s to the present day.

2018 Columbia, South Carolina

Anni Albers
C, 1969
screenprint
sheet: 24 x 22 in. (61 x 55.9 cm)

2018 Saint Louis, Missouri

Printing Abstraction considers what it means to create images without direct reference to the natural, visible world, focusing on line, color, and shape alone. Printmaking, which offers an expansive range of outcomes—from the crisp, mechanical contours of screenprint to aquatint's atmospheric shifts of tone—have served these artists' goals with exceptional results. The exhibition presents various strategies, from Op art to hard-edge abstraction and beyond, that have emerged over the past six decades. Featured artists include figures who defined the field, such as Anni Albers, Marcel Duchamp, and Ad Reinhardt. Works by artists from more recent generations, like McArthur Binion and James Turrell, speak to the continuing relevance of abstraction today.

2018 Kansas City, Missouri

Josef Albers
Homage to the Square: Blue and Dark Green Surrounded by Light Green, 1957
oil on canvas
16 x 16 in. (40.6 x 40.6 cm)
Museum Moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig Wien

2018 Vienna, Austria

Painting with Method: Neoavantgarde Positions from the Mumok Collection explores paintings from the 1960s and 1970s, an era characterized by its radical breaks with tradition and by redefinitions of creative approaches and artistic media. The emergence of media-based art and the link between the theory and practice of art, in turn, led to innovative forms of painting. The general tendency to abandon figurative, or gestural-abstract painting went hand in hand with the emergence of focused, formal and configured work structures referencing the general conditions of image and painting, as well as links to new art forms and media. Featured artists include Josef Albers, Alan Charlton, Helen Frankenthaler, Roland Goeschl, Ellsworth Kelly, Richard Kriesche, Morris Louis, Karel Malich, Brice Marden, Agnes Martin, Kenneth Noland, Jules Olitski, Hermann Painitz, Larry Poons, Ad Reinhardt, Gerhard Richter, and Zdeněk Sýkora, among others.

Josef Albers
Klaviaturen (Keyboards), 1932
sandblasted opaque flashed glass
14 3/4 x 25 1/2 in. (37.5 x 64.8 cm)
1976.6.7
Josef Albers
Treble Clef (G-Clef/Diskant VII), ca. 1932
sandblasted opaque flashed glass
29 3/4 x 17 3/8 in. (75.6 x 44.1 cm)
1976.6.11
Installation view, Sonic Albers, David Zwirner, New York, 2019. Photo courtesy David Zwirner

2019 New York

Sonic Albers examines Josef Albers's relationship to music, musical imagery, and sonic phenomena. Organized in collaboration with The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, the show provides a far-reaching look at this underexplored facet of the artist's practice and features a wide selection of paintings, glassworks, drawings, and ephemera from throughout Albers's career, including a number of the album covers he designed in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Josef Albers
Study for Homage to the Square, 1963
oil on masonite
16 x 16 in. (40.6 x 40.6 cm)
1976.1.155
Anni Albers
Textile sample, n.d.
jute, cotton, metallic fiber, and linen
4 3/8 x 7 1/4 in. (11.1 x 18.4 cm)
1994.15.87

2018 Siena + Cork + Zagreb

Voyage Inside a Blind Experience (VIBE) is an exhibition that has equal interest for seeing and for visually impaired people, examining the abstract works of Josef and Anni Albers. The project developed from a collaboration between Atlante Servizi Culturali and the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, together with the Istituto dei Ciechi di Milano, and with the support of the three European museums presenting the exhibition.