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OCTOBER 10 MZ Wallace x Albers Metro Tote benefits Le Foyer de Tambacounda

SEPTEMBER 23 Josef Albers's mural Manhattan is recreated for 200 Park Avenue, New York

SEPTEMBER 10 Camino Real is seen for the first time outside Mexico City

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A student at Le Foyer de Tambacounda with the MZ Wallace x Albers Metro Tote. Photo: Sofia Verzbolovskis

MZ Wallace x Albers Metro Tote benefits Le Foyer de Tambacounda

MZ Wallace, known for their beautiful and imaginative handbags, has generously created a limited-edition Metro Tote for the benefit of Le Foyer de Tambacounda. Le Foyer is an exceptional educational facility in Senegal that enables over 130 young women a year to determine their own futures. It is a major project of Le Korsa, an affiliate of the Albers Foundation that gives unprecedented physical health and educational and cultural opportunities in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Adorned with one of Josef Albers's dictums, "Good teaching is more a giving of right questions than a giving of right answers," the bag also includes two pouches, one of which features an Anni Albers quote: "Students worry about choosing their way. I always tell them, 'You can go anywhere from anywhere.'"

Monica Zwirner, a cofounder and designer at MZ Wallace said, "Empowering women has always been important to our philosophy of giving back to the community, whether on a local or global scale. Ensuring that women have access to an education, and the opportunities that arise from it, is an impactful way to put this philosophy into action. We are thrilled to partner with The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation to support Le Korsa."

For more information and to purchase a tote, visit https://www.mzwallace.com/features/albers

Installation view of Josef Albers's Manhattan, MetLife building, New York City (2019)

Josef Albers's mural Manhattan is recreated for 200 Park Avenue, New York

In 1963, Josef Albers was commissioned by architect Walter Gropius to create a large-scale mural for the new Pan-Am building adjacent to Grand Central Terminal in New York City. Based on Albers's 1928 glass construction, City, the mural was a monumental 55-foot-wide by 28-foot-tall work of art gracing the commutes of millions over the course of nearly 40 years. In 2000 the mural was removed during a building renovation. Now, after nearly 20 years, and with the enthusiastic support of Tishman Speyer, the building's current owners, and the architectural firm MdeAS Architects, in association with the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, the historic mural has been painstakingly recreated and installed in its original location at 200 Park Avenue. The new red, black, and white laminate boards were built at All Craft Fabricators on Long Island and resonate with the intensity of the original. Manhattan was unveiled on September 23, once again adding artistic energy to the daily lives of millions.

Anni Albers
Camino Real, 1968
wool felt on cotton support
115 3/4 x 105 7/8 in. (294 x 269 cm)
Manufactured by Abacrome Inc., New York
Hotel Camino Real, Mexico City
Installation image: David Zwirner Gallery, New York

Camino Real is seen for the first time outside Mexico City

Anni Albers's largest work, Camino Real (1968), is seen for the first time outside Mexico City in the exhibition Anni Albers at David Zwirner Gallery, New York (10 September–19 October 2019). Originally commissioned in 1967 by architects Ricardo Legoretta and Luis Barragán for the newly built Camino Real Hotel this wallhanging of appliquéd felt is over ten feet high and almost as wide. To achieve its large scale Albers enlisted the Manhattan company Abacrome that fabricated appliquéd flags and banners for artists like Roy Lichtenstein, Tom Wesselman, and Claes Oldenburg in the 1960s. Albers's embrace of a process that was closely associated with Pop artists is a perfect example of her consummate sense of appropriateness and her courage to experiment with new materials and methods. The results of this unlikely process pleased her so much that she adapted her original drawing for the project as the basis for a screenprint Camino Real.