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1919 Munich

Installation view, Josef Albers: Glasbilder, Bauhaus, Dessau, 1932. Photo: Josef Albers
Installation view, Josef Albers: Glasbilder, Bauhaus, Dessau, 1932. Photo: Josef Albers
Brochure for Josef Albers: Glasbilder, 1932
Brochure for Josef Albers: Glasbilder, 1932

1932 Dessau

Writing for Dessau's Volksblatt (the daily newspaper), an unknown reviewer said, "The decisive tone of this exhibition does not lie, however, in the Fensterbilder which come to life when the daylight passes through them, but rather in the Glasbilder, which like paintings are solidly framed on the wall. It is characteristic for our time that these pictures have a strong sense of tectonic contemporaneity about them. Indeed they possess the strongest sense of materiality. Alongside the age-old, hallowed media of oil, watercolor, and printmaking techniques, we have found new materials for pictures. And glass has huge developmental possibilities—it would be impact- and fire-resistant, it could be a building material—all self-evident now that we have a glass picture before us. As the painter paints, so Albers creates forms with glass."

Reviews

"At the Bauhaus: Glass Pictures by Josef Albers," Volksblatt, Dessau, May 4, 1932. The full review, translated into English, is available here (pdf).

Unknown author, "Kunstbolschewismus" Der Nationalsozialist (Weimar, Germany, 11 August 1932)

1932 Erfurt

An August 1932 exhibition of Josef Albers' glass works at the Association for Art and Applied Arts in Erfurt, Germany, met with utter condemnation from the critic for the newspaper of the National Socialists in nearby Weimar, the city that had been home to the Bauhaus school of design from 1919 to 1926. The review is entitled "Kunstbolschewismus"—Art Bolshevism—signaling that from the outset the reviewer considers modern art an act of revolution, but in a bad way. The writer goes on to say, "It is hard to understand why the leadership of the Erfurt Museum considers it necessary to bring to Erfurt the offshoots of the unfruitful and uncreative Dessau Bauhaus, which was stillborn from the first moments of its artistic existence in Weimar. The glass paintings of Professor Albers have no artistic or educational significance, nor the least bit of craftsmanship. They come off as a kind of highly superfluous aesthetic gimmick. This description, which the artist himself offers, might serve as a cautionary example of what art should not be. His so-called "Shard Pictures" resemble the blown glass creations of the middle ages. But while the latter are actual works of art, the artist describes his own works as "shard pictures: demonstrative reminders of economic inflation, created from pieces of broken bottles out of want for other materials, and in a related manner, mounted through reduced technical capacities." [...] That the interpretation of this artistic bolshevism borders on the ridiculous is further shown in the following "formal notes" by the "artist's hand:" thematically, the pictures are abstract. Formally, I am particularly interested in irrational combination, in the forms of mathematical figures, in the dynamic motion of ambiguity through modulating the quantities of colors."

1933 Berlin

1934 Havana

Bulletin of the Galleria del Milione, Milan, which served as the catalogue for this exhibition of Albers's woodblock prints. Wassily Kandinsky contributed a text on Albers to the catalogue.
Bulletin of the Galleria del Milione, Milan, which served as the catalogue for this exhibition of Albers's woodblock prints. Wassily Kandinsky contributed a text on Albers to the catalogue.
Bulletin of the Galleria del Milione, Milan, which served as the catalogue for this exhibition of Albers's woodblock prints. Wassily Kandinsky contributed a text on Albers to the catalogue.
Bulletin of the Galleria del Milione, Milan, which served as the catalogue for this exhibition of Albers's woodblock prints. Wassily Kandinsky contributed a text on Albers to the catalogue.
Bulletin of the Galleria del Milione, Milan, which served as the catalogue for this exhibition of Albers's woodblock prints. Wassily Kandinsky contributed a text on Albers to the catalogue.
Bulletin of the Galleria del Milione, Milan, which served as the catalogue for this exhibition of Albers's woodblock prints. Wassily Kandinsky contributed a text on Albers to the catalogue.
Bulletin of the Galleria del Milione, Milan, which served as the catalogue for this exhibition of Albers's woodblock prints. Wassily Kandinsky contributed a text on Albers to the catalogue.
Bulletin of the Galleria del Milione, Milan, which served as the catalogue for this exhibition of Albers's woodblock prints. Wassily Kandinsky contributed a text on Albers to the catalogue.

1934 Milan

1934 Rotterdam

1935 Andover, Massachusetts

1935 Asheville, North Carolina

1936 Black Mountain, North Carolina

1936 Cambridge, Massachusetts

1936 Mexico City

1936 New York

1937 Chicago

1937 Chicago

1937 New London, Connecticut

1937 Norfolk, Virginia

1938 Dallas

1938 Minneapolis

1938 New York

1938 New York

1938 New York

1939 Atlanta

1939 Philadelphia

1939 Roanoke, Virginia

1939 Wilmington, North Carolina

1940 New Orleans

1940 San Francisco

1941 Boston

1941 Los Angeles

1941 New York

1942 Albuquerque

1942 Baltimore

1942 Boston

1942 Cambridge, Massachusetts

1942 Kansas City, Missouri

1942 Santa Fe, New Mexico

1943 Denton, Texas

1943 Greensboro, North Carolina

1944 Atlanta

1944 Bennington, Vermont

1945 Des Moines, Iowa

1945 New York

1946 Minneapolis

1946 New York

[FULL TEXT FOR SUB HEADLINE] Egan Gallery, Josef Albers: Graphic Works, 1–12 October 1946. Exhibition of 30 prints traveled to Cranbrook Academy, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan; Mills College, Oakland, California; University Gallery, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Art Institute of Chicago, 7 September–20 October 1946; University of Louisville, Kentucky; Central College, Fayette, Missouri; North Texas State Teachers College, Denton, Texas; Denver Art Museum; Santa Barbara Museum; Pasadena Art Institute; Pat Wall Gallery, Monterey, California

1946 New York

1946 Roanoke, Virginia

1946 Tallahassee, Florida

1947 Black Mountain, North Carolina

1947 Memphis

1947 Monterey, California

1947 New York

1947 San Francisco

1948 Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

1948 Chicago

1949 Berlin

1949 Cincinnati

1949 Cleveland

1949 Dallas

1949 Durham, North Carolina

1949 Easton, Pennsylvania

1949 New Haven

1949 New York

1949 New York

1950 Boston

1950 Chicago

1950 Louisville, Kentucky

1950 New London, Connecticut

1950 Utica, New York

1950 Washington, D.C.

1950 Wellesley, Massachusetts

1951 Detroit

1951 Philadelphia

1952 Chicago

1952 New York

1952 Philadelphia

1953 Essex, Connecticut

1953 Hartford, Connecticut

1953 Redlands, California

1954 Honolulu

1955 Cambridge, Massachusetts

1955 New York

1956 New Haven

1957 Hagen

1957 Kassel

1957 Paris

1957 Ulm

1958 Berlin

1958 Bottrop

1958 Freiburg im Breisgau

1958 New York

1959 Chicago

1959 Dortmund

1959 Locarno

1959 Münster

1959 New York

1959 New York

1959 Saratoga Springs, New York

1960 Cleveland

1960 Los Angeles

1960 Zürich

1961 Amsterdam

1961 London

1961 Milan

1961 New York

1962 Boston

1962 Chicago

1962 Katonah, New York

1962 Los Angeles

1962 Raleigh

1962 Washington, D.C.

1962 Wiesbaden

1962 Zürich

1963 Cambridge, Massachusetts

1963 Copenhagen

1963 Dallas

[FULL TEXT FOR SUB HEADLINE] Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, The Interaction of Color: A Presentation of Paintings and the Color Theory of Josef Albers, 30 April—26 May 1963. Under auspices of the Smithsonian Institution, exhibition traveled to San Francisco Museum of Art, 14 June—14 July 1963; Fisher Gallery, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, October 1963; Worth Ryder Art Gallery, Kroeber Hall, University of California, Berkeley, 24 November 1963—2 January 1964; General Motors Styling Center, Detroit, 31 January—28 February 1964

1963 Essen

1963 Los Angeles

1963 New York

1964 Bern

1964 Munich

1964 New York

[FULL TEXT FOR SUB HEADLINE] Museum of Modern Art, International Council, Josef Albers: Homage to the Square. Exhibition traveled to 11 venues in Latin America and 11 venues in the United States: Galleria Mendoza, Caracas, Venezuela, 8 March–29 March 1964; Centro de Artes y Letras, Montevideo, Uruguay, 20 April–17 May 1964; Instituto Torcuato di Tella, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 9 June–5 July 1964; Instituto de Arte Contemporañeo, Lima, Peru, 14 September–11 October 1964; Instituto Brasil-Estados Unidos, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 5 November–30 November 1964; Museu de Arte Contemporañea, São Paulo, Brazil, 7 December–23 December 1964; USIS Guayaquil de Cultura Ecuadoriana, Guayaquil, Ecuador, 8 January–5 February 1965; Ecuadoran-American Cultural Center, Quito, Ecuador, 8 January–5 February 1965; Bi-National Center, Bogota, Colombia, 19 February–19 March 1965; Museo de Arte Contemporañeo, Santiago, Chile, April 1965; Museo de Arte y Ciencas de la Universidad, Mexico City, July–August 1965; Dulin Gallery of Art, Knoxville, Tennessee, 15 October–7 November 1965; Huntington Galleries, Huntington, West Virginia, 19 November–12 December 1965; Rochester Memorial Art Gallery, Rochester, New York, 7 January–4 February 1966; State University College, Oswego, New York, 21 February–14 March 1966; Atlanta Art Association Museum, Atlanta, Georgia, 25 March–24 April 1966; Marion Koogler McNay Art Institute, San Antonio, Texas, 9 May–6 June 1966; George Thomas Hunter Gallery of Art, Chattanooga, Tennessee, 24 June–17 July 1966; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 14 August–18 September 1966; Madison Art Center, Madison, Wisconsin, 3 October–24 October 1966; Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, Virginia, 7 November–4 December 1966; Wichita Art Museum, Wichita, Kansas, 2 January–22 January 1967

1964 New York

1964 Northampton, Massachusetts

1964 Rapperswil, Switzerland

1964 Soest

1964 Stockholm

1964 Winterthur, Switzerland

1965 Cincinnati

[FULL TEXT FOR SUB HEADLINE] Contemporary Arts Center, Paintings by Josef Albers, 18 May 1965–August 1965. Exhibition traveled to Boise Art Association, Boise, Idaho, 24 August–24 September 1965; Contemporary Art Association, Houston, Texas, 1 October–3 November 1965; Newcomb College, New Orleans, Louisiana, 14 November–14 December 1965; Forth Worth Art Center, Fort Worth, Texas, 23 December 1965–21 January 1966; Laguna Gloria Art Museum, Austin, Texas, 31 January–15 March 1966; Colorado Springs Fine Art Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado, 12 April–16 May 1966; Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio, 1 June–14 July 1966

1965 Düsseldorf

1965 Esslingen

1965 Hartford, Connecticut

1965 London

1965 Milan

1965 Siegen

1965 Washington, D.C.

1965 Zürich

1966 New Haven

1966 Washington, D.C.

1967 Bern

1967 Lancaster, Pennsylvania

1967 Mexico City

1967 Münster

1967 Rome

1967 Seattle

Washington Western Association of Art Museums, Josef Albers. Exhibition traveled to Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, Michigan, 1–30 April 1967; Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix, Arizona, May–June 1967; Milwaukee Art Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, August–September 1967; Allentown Museum, Allentown, Pennsylvania, 1–31 October 1967; Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, 6–27 November 1967; Edmonton Art Gallery, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, December 1967; Asheville-Biltmore College, Asheville, North Carolina, 3–28 February 1968; University of Michigan Museum of Art, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1–30 April 1968; Northern Michigan University, Marquette, Michigan, 1–30 May 1968; Northern Illinois University, Normal, Illinois, 3–28 June 1968; Bergstrom Art Center, Neenah, Wisconsin, 14 August–8 September 1968

1967 Sydney

1968 Bielefeld

1968 Boston

1968 Cologne

1968 Münster

1968 New York

1968 Paris

1969 Bottrop

1969 Høvikodden, Norway

1969 Mexico City

1969 Munich

1969 Nuremberg

1970 Caracas

1970 Düsseldorf

1970 Hamburg

1970 Macerata, Italy

1970 Munich

1970 New York

1970 Zürich

1971 Detroit

1971 Knokke, Belgium

1971 New York

1971 New York

1971 Princeton, New Jersey

1971 Turin

1971 Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Croatia)

1972 Milan

1972 Munich

1972 Toronto

1973 Basel

1973 Bottrop

1973 Caracas

1973 Cologne

1973 Hannover

1973 Paris

1973 Toronto

1974 Milan

1974 Paris

1976 Bamberg

1976 Bolzano

1976 Cologne

1976 Krefeld

1978 New Haven

1979 Berlin

1979 Ridgefield, Connecticut

1980 Barcelona

1980 Bonn

1980 Stockholm

1981 Montclair, New Jersey

1983 Bottrop

1983 Hagen

1983 New York

1984 London

1984 New York

1984 Paris

1985 Los Angeles

1985 Montreal

1985 Montreal

1986 Cologne

1986 Coral Gables, Florida

1986 New York

1986 Tokyo

1987 Düsseldorf

1987 Madrid

1987 New York

[FULL TEXT FOR SUB HEADLINE] American Federation of Arts, The Photographs of Josef Albers: A Selection from the Collection of the Josef Albers Foundation. Exhibition traveled to Mary and Leigh Block Gallery, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, 15 June–9 August 1987; Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, Iowa, 23 August–18 October 1987; Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, 8 November 1987–3 January 1988; Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY, 27 January–5 April 1988; Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado, 24 July–18 September 1988; Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 8 January–5 March 1989; Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 26 March–1 May 1989

1987 Paris

1988 London

1988 New York

1988 New York

1988 New York

1988 Tourcoing, France

1988 Ulm

1989 Ferrara

1989 London

1989 Milan

1989 New York

1990 Houston

1990 Munich

1990 Stockholm

1991 Alexandria, Virginia

[FULL TEXT FOR SUB HEADLINE] Art Services International, Josef Albers: Works on Paper, Exhibition traveled to J.B. Speed Art Museum, Louisville, Kentucky, 16 September—3 November 1991; Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, South Carolina, 6 December 1991—12 January 1992; Huntsville Museum of Art, Huntsville, Alabama, 1 February—15 March 1992; Bakersfield Museum of Art, Bakersfield, California, 4 April—17 May 1992; Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, 8 August—20 September 1992; Knoxville Museum of Art, Knoxville, Tennessee, 10 October—29 November 1992; Bard College, Edith C. Blum Art Institute, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, 19 December 1992—4 April 1993; Josef Albers Museum, Bottrop, Germany, 5 May—end of July 1993; Amos Anderson Art Museum, Helsinki, Finland, 26 August—10 October 1993; Haus für konstruktive und konkrete Kunst, Zürich, Switzerland, 12 November 1993—9 January 1994; Museum für Konkrete Kunst, Ingolstadt, Germany, 22 January—20 February 1994; Sala de Exposiciones Rekalde, Bilbao, Spain, 15 September—30 October 1994

1991 Marfa, Texas

1992 Bottrop

1992 Cologne

1992 Tokyo

1992 Vienna

1993 New York

1994 London

1994 London

1994 Venice

[FULL TEXT FOR SUB HEADLINE] Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Josef Albers: Glass, Color, and Light, 30 March–10 July 1994. Exhibition traveled to Palazzo delle Esposizioni, Rome, Italy, 21 July–3 October 1994 [Josef Albers: Vetro, colore e luce]; IVAM Centre Julio González, Valencia, Spain, 3 November 1994–8 January 1995 [Josef Albers: Vidrio, Color y Luz]; Josef Albers Museum, Bottrop, Germany, 12 February–15 April 1995 [Josef Albers: Glas–Farbe–Licht]; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 7 June–17 September 1995

1995 New York

1995 Northampton, Massachusetts

1995 Reykjavik

1995 Vienna

1996 Cologne

1996 Comune de Villa Carcina, Italy

1996 London

1996 New York

1996 New York

1996 Rome

1997 Paris

1997 Tokyo

1998 Bern

1998 Bonn

1998 New York

1998 Plieux, France

1999 Brussels

1999 London

2000 Bayreuth

2000 Boston

2001 London

2001 London

2001 Milan

2002 Bratislava, Slovak Republic

2002 Los Angeles

2002 Niigata City, Japan

2002 Paris

2002 Paris

2003 New York

2003 New York

2004 Boston

2004 London

2004 Madrid

2004 New York

2004 Scottsdale, Arizona

2004 Veszprém, Hungary

2005 Bologna

2005 London

2005 Ludwigshafen-am-Rhein

2005 New York

2006 Cologne

2006 Columbus, Georgia

2006 London

2006 Madrid

[FULL TEXT FOR SUB HEADLINE] Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Anni y Josef Albers. Viajes por Latinoamérica, 14 November 2006–12 February 2007. Exhibition traveled to Josef Albers Museum, Bottrop, Germany, 11 March–3 June 2007 [Anni und Josef Albers: Begegnung mit Lateinamerika]; Museo de Arte de Lima, Peru, 27 June–23 September 2007; Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso, Mexico City, Mexico, 6 November 2007–23 March 2008; Museu Oscar Niemeyer, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil, 29 May–24 August 2008 [Anni e Josef Albers: Viagens pela América Latina]

2006 Naples, Italy

2006 New York

2007 Erlangen

2007 London

2007 Mexico City

2007 New York

2007 Rome

2008 Bottrop

2008 Le Cateau-Cambrésis, France

2008 New York

2008 Sarasota, Florida

2009 Brooklyn

2009 Cologne

2009 London

2009 Mannheim

2009 São Paulo

2010 Bottrop

2010 Bottrop

2010 Kaohsiung City, Taiwan

Josef Albers
Color study for White Line Square [Homage to the Square], ca. 1966
Oil on blotting paper, with gouache, pencil and varnish
13 1/8 x 12 in. (33.3 x 30.4 cm)
1976.2.22

2010 Munich

Josef Albers in America: Painting on Paper presents the many studies that Josef Albers made for his paintings. With approximately eighty oil sketches on paper, the exhibition reveals a private side of Albers's work. These sketches were never exhibited in the artist's lifetime and have rarely been seen after his death. On view are early studies (1930s–early 1940s), studies for Albers's Adobe series, inspired by Mexican architecture (1940s–early 1950s), and studies for Homage to the Square (1950s–1970s). These vibrant sketches provide insights into the artist's working process and, in contrast to the austerity and strict geometry of the final paintings, are remarkable for their freedom and sensuality. Works are drawn from the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation in Bethany, Connecticut and the Josef Albers Museum in Bottrop, Germany.

Touring Exhibition Venues

A complete list of exhibition venues is available here (pdf).

2010 New York

2010 Washington, D.C.

2011 London

2011 Modena

2011 Waterloo, New South Wales, Australia

2012 Berlin

2012 Cork, Ireland

2012 Paris

Josef Albers
Formulation Articulation: Folio II / Folder 28, 1972
Screenprint

2013 Stuart, Florida + Orono, Maine

Albers and Heirs celebrates Josef Albers's extensive contribution as an artist and educator. Paintings by Albers are complemented by the work of two of his students, Neil Welliver and Jane Davis Doggett. Welliver and Doggett mastered Albers's discipline of the interaction of color and made it central to their work.

Installation view, Josef Albers, Art as Experience: The Teaching Methods of a Bauhaus Master, Pinacoteca Comunale, 2013
Installation view, Josef Albers, Art as Experience: The Teaching Methods of a Bauhaus Master, Pinacoteca Comunale, 2013
Installation view, Josef Albers, Art as Experience: The Teaching Methods of a Bauhaus Master, Pinacoteca Comunale, 2013
Installation view, Josef Albers, Art as Experience: The Teaching Methods of a Bauhaus Master, Pinacoteca Comunale, 2013

2013 Citta di Castello

The experience of artistic creation that Josef Albers came to represent is exactly what we mean by the word "art." A wide, varied concept that Albers managed to express, devoting his whole life to it, and above all conveying the extraordinary wisdom that ties the creative process to the real world. It is a process which cannot be taught, but which can make us capable of seeing. Josef Albers's work as a teacher is one of the aspects that best illustrates his revolutionary force and that makes him one of the founders of exact art. The exhibition is guided by the works and testimonies left by Albers's numerous students, friends, and colleagues, and by Albers himself who always conceived of teaching as a natural act of moral duty. Josef Albers, Art as Experience: The Teaching Methods of a Bauhaus Master is a homage to Josef Albers, to an idea that becomes concrete, that becomes design, and to creative research that manages to be both subjective and rigorous: in short to the discovery of artistic experience which is unique, personal, and constantly evolving. The exhibition allows the public to observe the works, projects, and drawings of Albers's students at the Bauhaus, Black Mountain College and the Yale University School of Art, many of them previously unseen and housed at the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation.

2013 Madrid

Installation View, Sublime Optics
Installation View, Sublime Optics
Installation View, Sublime Optics
Josef Albers
Pink-Orange Surrounded by 4 Grays, 1947–52
oil on masonite
1976.1.1380
Josef Albers
Equal and Unequal, 1939
oil on masonite
1976.1.80
Josef Albers
Slanting Cross, 1938
oil on masonite
1938.1.6
Josef Albers
Heraldic, 1935
oil on stainless steel
1976.1.1863
Josef Albers
Falschgewickelt (Rolled Wrongly), 1931
sandblasted opaque flashed glass
1976.6.22
Josef Albers
Homage to the Square, 1976
oil on masonite
1976.1.524

2013 Milan

Josef Albers: Sublime Optics takes as its foundation Josef Albers's worship of the inexplicable, in a monographic exhibition featuring works that span Albers's career. From his very first extant drawing to his very last Homage to the Square painting, works from every period are seen in an installation organized to engage with Albers's own procedure for approaching the sublime: that of diligent—nearly scientific—consideration of the physical world. The over-eighty works—including lithographs, prints, collages, and paintings all taken from the holdings of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation—are arranged around three of Albers's own visual fundamentals: line, form, and color. Each space features work from different parts of Albers's extensive career, while works from the same period can be seen in different contexts. Each of his artworks functions as an exercise itself, teaching those he couldn't reach in his classrooms, to open their eyes and recognize the sublime. Josef Albers: Sublime Optics was curated by Nick Murphy at the Fondazione Stelline, Milan based on the original exhibitions—The Sacred Modernist: Josef Albers as a Catholic Artist at the Glucksman Gallery, University College, Cork and Josef Albers: Spirituality and Rigor at the Galleria Nazionale del Umbria, Perugia arranged by Nicholas Fox Weber in 2012 and 2013.

Installation View,
Kunst als Erfahrung. Josef Albers als Lehrer
Josef Albers Museum Quadrat, Bottrop
Installation View,
Kunst als Erfahrung. Josef Albers als Lehrer
Josef Albers Museum Quadrat, Bottrop
Installation View,
Kunst als Erfahrung. Josef Albers als Lehrer
Josef Albers Museum Quadrat, Bottrop
Unknown Student
Typography re-ordering Study, n.d.
Bauhaus Dessau
1976.26.7
Unknown Student
Typewriter study, n.d.
Bauhaus Dessau
1976.26.11
D. McBrayer
Color study (vibrating boundaries), ca. 1951-1954
Yale University
1976.26.518
Unknown Student
Material study of burlap and wire screen, n.d.
Bauhaus Dessau
1976.26.64
Unknown Student
Color study (transparency), n.d.
Yale University
1976.26.630
James Dixon
Matiére study with rubber bands and sunflower seeds, ca. 1954
Yale University
1976.26.713
Unknown Student
Folded paper construction, n.d.
Yale University
1976.26.755
Silverberg
Drawing of ellipses, n.d.
Yale University
1976.26.772
Ruth Asawa
Circles, ca. 1946–49
oil on paper
5 x 12 in. (12.7 x 30.5 cm)
2007.30.13

2013 Milan + Bottrop

The exhibition, curated by Atlante Cultura in collaboration with the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, explores the connection between Albers's work as an artist and his role as one of the foremost teachers of art of the twentieth century. Through Albers's own words, videos, photographs, projects and original works by Albers and his students the exhibition illustrates the teaching methods that Albers considered to be a full-fledged pedagogical science. It highlights Albers's belief in the necessity of the artist's ability to take risks, to have a sense of curiosity towards his surroundings, and to engage in continuous experimentation. The exhibition includes more than one hundred works in all mediums created by Albers's students at the Bauhaus, Black Mountain College and Yale University drawn from the rich holdings of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation.

Josef Albers
White Cross, 1937
oil on wood composition board
1976.1.1006
Installation View, Spirituality and Rigor
Installation View, Spirituality and Rigor
Josef Albers
Rosa Mystica Ora Pr[o] Nobis, 1918, Reproduced in 2011
Stained glass window, Church of St Michael, Bottrop (original destroyed)
2011.6.1
Josef Albers
Variant / Adobe, 1948
oil and graphite on blotting paper
17 3/4 x 21 7/8 in. (45.1 x 55.6 cm)
1976.2.113
Josef Albers
Homage to the Square, 1967
oil on masonite
1976.1.738

2013 Perugia

Josef Albers professed his Catholic faith with reserve and discretion, even in the rare cases when he engaged directly with the iconography of Christian mysticism. Allegories, symbols—with the partial exception of the cross—and didactic intentions are completely foreign to Albers's oeuvre. The rigorous manner in which Albers ruled out from his painting any element that might anchor it to history, literature, religion, science, and even the contemporary world and his own personal life, represents a crucial prerequisite for the absolute quality of his works and for his own abstraction from the ordinary passing of time. This suspension and escape from the stream of events constitutes in itself one of the preconditions for sacredness. The exhibition Josef Albers: Spirituality and Rigor maps the paths that Albers's work took on the road to achieving that quality and sacredness, culminating in the Homage to the Square series which occupied most of the final quarter century of his life. A genuine ascetic of the arts, Albers knew how to draw strength from his sacrifices: "no smock, no skylight, no studio, no palette, no easel, no brushes, no medium, no canvas." The changeless quality of this process of execution and its repetition day after day suggest an inner order and harmony, a commitment so great that it turns the creation of paintings into a kind of individual ritual; a liturgy that constitutes an expression of the sacredness of painting. By virtue of this independence and ethical rigor, which bars all exceptions, tricks, and shortcuts, the works acquire their authenticity, their "truth" and capacity to serve as a means to spiritual elevation, their universality.

Josef Albers
Homage to the Square, 1976
oil on masonite
1976.1.524
Josef Albers
Homage to the Square (A), 1950
oil on masonite
The Cartin Collection

2014 Bottrop

A special exhibit at the Josef Albers Museum affords a special look at Albers's Homage to the Square series; for the first time this exhibit brings together the first and the last paintings of the series. The breadth of Albers's art is thus brought to our attention in an exemplary fashion. Contrary to the suggestion in the title, Homage to the Square is not an homage to a geometrical shape, but rather a celebration of color and its limitless possibilities of expression. Albers chooses the established square pictorial scheme because of its compact frontality, which strides up to us like an icon and thus also becomes a shape in the background of our attention. Thus we can concentrate on the countless variations in the conversation of the colors. This involves a complex equilibrium among the identities of all the colors, which interact and thus change one another's appearance. "Color is the most relative medium in art," Albers once declared, so it is the observer, who uses vision to set into movement the apparently statically placed color gradations. The painting becomes a living organism, the effect of which is not restricted to the retina, but rather is reflected in our consciousness and emotions.

Josef Albers
Study for Graphic Tectonic, ca. 1942
ink on paper
1976.3.214
Installation view, Black and White
Installation view, Black and White
Installation view, Black and White
Installation view, Black and White
Installation view, Black and White
Installation view, Black and White
Installation view, Black and White
Installation view, Black and White
Installation view, Black and White
Josef Albers
Movement in Gray, 1939
oil on masonite
1976.1.1866
Josef Albers
Gray Facade, 1947-1954
oil on masonite
1976.1.1113
Josef Albers
Steps, 1931/1956
casein on masonite
1976.1.1873
Josef Albers
Color study for Homage to the Square, n.d.
oil on blotting paper
1976.2.196
Josef Albers
Color study for Homage
to the Square
, ca. 1950
oil on blotting paper
1976.2.197
Josef Albers
Treble Clef, n.d.
gouache on paper
1976.2.0215
Josef Albers
Pyramid of the Magician, Uxmal, 1952
unmounted photograph
1976.7.594
Josef Albers
Structural Constellation [From Transformation of a Scheme series], n.d. (ca. 1950)
machine engraving on black laminated plastic
1976.8.1757

2014 London

Waddington Custot Galleries present Josef Albers: Black and White in association with the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation. This is the first exhibition to be held in the UK which explores the importance of black and white in Josef Albers's work. Almost 50 selected works testify to Albers's versatility as an artist. Albers explored the power of black throughout his life. His thorough use of black using multiple materials helped inform his knowledge and understanding of colour. Works in the exhibition include his earliest extant drawing from 1911, his Bauhaus glass constructions and photo collages. An important set of six Treble Clef gouaches from the 1930s show his subtle symbioses of black, white and grey. Six Graphic Tectonic drawings from the 1940s and Structural Constellations from the 1950s show geometric precision and exemplify his wish to create 'maximum effect' from 'minimal means'.

Reviews

"Square Dance" by Andrew Lambirth, The Spectator (London), May 24, 2014

Josef Albers
Angular, 1935
oil on composition board
2003.1.1
Josef Albers
Homage to the Square, n.d.
oil on masonite
1976.1.1340
Josef Albers
To Mitla, 1940
oil on masonite
1976.1.1364
Josef Albers
Luminous Day, 1947-1952
oil on masonite
1976.1.1382
Josef Albers
Self-Portrait VI, ca. 1919
ink on paper
1976.3.133
Josef Albers
Never Before f, 1976
screenprint
1976.4.231.6
Josef Albers
Gitterbild (Grid Mounted), ca. 1921-22
glass assemblage
12 3/4 x 11 3/8 in. (32.4 x 28.9 cm)
1976.6.21
Josef Albers
Structural Constellation: Structural
Indication
, 1948
machine engraving on gray laminated plastic
1976.8.1726
Josef Albers
Stacking tables, ca. 1927
ash veneer, black lacquer, and painted glass
15 5/8 x 16 1/2 x 15 3/4 in. (39.2 x 41.9 x 40 cm)
18 5/8 x 18 7/8 x 15 3/4 in. (47.3 x 48 x 40 cm)
21 3/4 x 21 x 15 3/4 in. (55.4 x 53.3 x 40 cm)
24 5/8 x 23 5/8 x 15 7/8 in. (62.6 x 60.1 x 40.3 cm)
2000.5.3a-d
Installation view, Medios Minimos-Efecto Maximo, Fundación Juan March, Madrid
Installation view, Medios Minimos-Efecto Maximo, Fundación Juan March, Madrid
Installation view, Medios Minimos-Efecto Maximo, Fundación Juan March, Madrid
Installation view, Medios Minimos-Efecto Maximo, Fundación Juan March, Madrid
Installation view, Medios Minimos-Efecto Maximo, Fundación Juan March, Madrid
Installation view, Medios Minimos-Efecto Maximo, Fundación Juan March, Madrid
Installation view, Minimal Means, Maximum Effect,
Henie Onstad Kunstsenter, Høvikodden
photographer, Øystein Thorvaldsen
Installation view, Minimal Means, Maximum Effect,
Henie Onstad Kunstsenter, Høvikodden
photographer, Øystein Thorvaldsen
Installation view, Minimal Means, Maximum Effect,
Henie Onstad Kunstsenter, Høvikodden
photographer, Øystein Thorvaldsen
Installation view, Minimal Means, Maximum Effect,
Henie Onstad Kunstsenter, Høvikodden
photographer, Øystein Thorvaldsen
Installation view, Minimal Means, Maximum Effect,
Henie Onstad Kunstsenter, Høvikodden
photographer, Øystein Thorvaldsen

2014 Madrid + Oslo

Josef Albers: Minimal Means, Maximum Effect is the first retrospective in Spain devoted to Josef Albers (1888–1976). Notwithstanding its retrospective character, the exhibition is not structured as a simple chronological survey of the artist's work. Rather, it presents the work of Josef Albers as a project equally characterized by its coherence and its search for simplicity, its productive use of deliberately limited means and resources, its respect for manual labor and its emphasis on experimentation with color, taking material shape in a body of work with a marked poetic and spiritual content. Albers's output is decidedly the result of a judicious administration of artistic resources. In its totality his oeuvre is the consequence of a true "economy of form." The exhibition catalogue includes an extensive documentary section with 57 texts by Albers, 26 of them previously unpublished. In addition to his early figurative drawings, in which the effectiveness of the "economical" lines is already notable, the show includes works in stained glass, furniture and objects designed during the Bauhaus period, as well as graphic work and paintings from the artist's years in North America.

Josef Albers
Fenced, 1944
Linoleum cut
1976.4.113
Josef Albers
Study for 'Fenced', ca.1944
Ink and pencil on paper
1976.3.259
Josef Albers
Study for 'Fenced', ca.1944
Ink and pencil on paper
1976.3.187
Josef Albers
Multiplex B, 1948
Woodcut
1976.4.121
Josef Albers
Cosmic, 1934
Woodcut
1976.4.80
Josef Albers
Study for 'Adapted', ca.1944
Ink and pencil on paper
1976.3.256
Josef Albers
WLS XI, 1966
Three-color aluminum plate lithograph
1976.4.172.3
Josef Albers
Color study (Homage to the Square / White Line Square), n.d.
Oil on blotting paper
1976.2.1401
Josef Albers
Color study (Homage to the Square), n.d.
Oil on paper
1976.2.1510
Josef Albers
Study for 'Multiplex B', n.d.
Pencil on tracing paper with red pencil on verso
1976.3.510
Installation view, Process and Printmaking, Josef Albers Museum Quadrat, Bottrop
Installation view, Process and Printmaking, Josef Albers Museum Quadrat, Bottrop
Installation view, Process and Printmaking, Museo Fundación Juan March, Palma
Installation view, Process and Printmaking, Museo Fundación Juan March, Palma
Installation view, Process and Printmaking, Museo Fundación Juan March, Palma

2014 Palma + Cuenca + Bottrop

Josef Albers: Process and Printmaking explores the Josef Albers's lifelong interest in printmaking. From the stark black and white of his earliest woodblock prints whose motifs were drawn from the coal mining landscape of Albers's Westphalian hometown, Bottrop, to the vivid colors and abstract geometry in screen prints of the 1960s and 1970s, Albers, like so many artists, was drawn to printmaking by the economy of production, freedom of creation, and the opportunity for trial and error, experimentation, and innovation the medium offered. Albers experimented with a range of printed mediums, from relief prints in wood and linoleum; to stone, color, and zinc plate lithographs; intaglio techniques; and screen prints. With just over one hundred works, the exhibition allows a rare view into the workings of the artist's imagination, showing individual studies and extended series in which the process and progress of image making is laid out. The transformation and resolution of idea into form occurs in a revelatory manner in the viewer's presence. Seen together with their studies, Albers's printed works reveal the unfolding of a nuanced understanding of how elements of form—texture, line, and color—can reveal rich and astonishing visual experiences.

Josef Albers
Untitled Abstraction, n.d.
watercolor on blotting paper
1976.2.194
Josef Albers
Monument of General
Omega [Monument]
, 1936
oil on composition board
1976.1.1004
Josef Albers
Homage to the Square: New Gate, 1951
oil on masonite
1976.1.702
Josef Albers
Escape, 1942
drypoint
1976.4.92
Josef Albers
Rondo, 1942
drypoint
1976.4.97
Josef Albers
Maturity III, ca. 1940
woodcut with black ink
1976.4.236b
Josef Albers
Scherbe ins Gitterbild (Shards
in Screen), ca. 1921
glass, wire, and sheet metal
1976.6.24
Installation view, Josef Albers/Joan Miró:The Thrill of Seeing, Fundació Pilar y Joan Miró, Palma
Installation view, Josef Albers/Joan Miró:The Thrill of Seeing, Fundació Pilar y Joan Miró, Palma
Installation view, Josef Albers/Joan Miró:The Thrill of Seeing, Fundació Pilar y Joan Miró, Palma
Installation view, Josef Albers/Joan Miró:The Thrill of Seeing, Fundació Pilar y Joan Miró, Palma
Installation view, Josef Albers/Joan Miró:The Thrill of Seeing, Fundació Pilar y Joan Miró, Palma

2014 Palma, Mallorca

Josef Albers/Joan Miró:The Thrill of Seeing integrates Miró's paintings, drawings, and sculpture, from the collection of the Fundación Pilar y Joan Miró, with Albers's paintings, prints, and glass work, from the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, to reveal visual and spiritual similarities. Conceived by Nicholas Fox Weber, director of the Albers Foundation, in cooperation with Elvira Camera, director of the Fundacion Miró, it presents a lively selection of art works, ranging from little-known studies to recognizable masterpieces, that delight the viewer in showing to what a great degree Albers and Miró shared the inclusiveness of their vision, their openness to forms and colors and objects and people and the natural and the manmade and daytime and nighttime without qualification or preference. Albers and Miró were both great painters, and they both had that deep and abiding love for life; Josef Albers/Joan Miro:The Thrill of Seeing makes the pleasures and common ground of their work available to viewers in an unprecedented way.

Josef Albers
Album cover for Leonid Hambro and Jascha Zayde Magnificent Two Piano Performances, 1961
offset printed record album jacket
1976.17.B7
Josef Albers
Album cover for Mossorgsky–Ravel Pictures At An Exhibition,1961
offset printed record album jacket
1976.17.B6
Josef Albers
Album cover for Persuasive Percussion, Volume 3, 1960
offset printed record album jacket
1976.17.B3
Josef Albers
Album cover for Provocative Percussion, Volume 3, 1961
offset printed record album jacket
1976.17.B5

2015 Los Angeles

The series of records made by Command Records almost 56 years ago still resonates with audiophiles and are much sought after by connoisseurs of mid-century modern design. The covers represent a result of the meeting of two individuals, Josef Albers and Enoch Light. Both men driven by a strong conviction about their respective crafts—one an influential teacher and artist, and the other a stereorecording pioneer. Although Albers is a legendary figure in the graphic design world, the artwork he did for Command represent nearly the only examples of his commercial work. The designs pushed the level of abstraction never before seen on records, while the albums pushed the capabilities of the recording and reproduction of stereo sound. Perfectly matched, and bold for their time, the records benefited from a growing class of post-war consumers interested in a comfortable lifestyle, and were a big commercial success. The covers are a testament to the value of trusting in strong, visual design and serve as a manifestation of the commingling of European Modernist ideals.

Anni Albers, Mitla, Mexico, 1936–37
photograph by Josef Albers
1976.19.5729
Josef Albers, Mitla, Mexico, 1939
photograph by Anni Albers or William Reed
1976.19.12114
Anni Albers
Study for Camino Real, ca. 1967
gouache on blueprint paper
sheet: 17 5/8 x 15 7/8 in. (44.8 x 40.3 cm)
1994.10.21
Josef Albers
Familiar Front, 1948–52
oil on masonite
13 3/4 x 21 in. (33 x 53.3 cm)
1976.1.1383
Josef Albers
Layered, 1940
oil on masonite
23 1/2 x 28 in. (59.7 x 71.1 cm)
1976.1.1032
Anni Albers
Two, 1952
linen, cotton, rayon
18 1/2 x 40 1/4 in. (47 x 102.2 cm)
1996.12.3
Andean textile fragment (Late Horizon)
cotton and wool
11 1/8 x 10 1/2 in. (28.3 x 26.7 cm)
1994.16.97
Andean textile fragment (Huari)
wool
8 3/4 x 4 5/8 in. (22.2 x 11.7 cm)
1994.16.6

2015 Milan

A Beautiful Confluence: Anni and Josef Albers and the Latin American World presents the art of the 20th-century masters in tandem with the pre-Columbian objects they collected from the time they moved to America in 1933 until Josef's death in 1976. In fourteen trips to Mexico and other countries in Central and South America, they discovered that "Art is everywhere." The Alberses felt an emotional camaraderie with stonecutters and potters and weavers, some of whom lived centuries ago, because of a shared interest in line and color and artistic technique. With little money, the couple amassed an important collection, and the exchange between what they bought and their own work became powerful. This exhibition, featuring more than 200 objects, reveals the similar visual and artistic interests and personal passions of Anni and Josef and the Latin American world that became their haven. For more information, visit abeautifulconfluence.com

Selected Reviews

"Bauhaus below the Border" by Charles Darwent, The World of Interiors, December 2015

"Josef and Anni Albers' Latin American Road Trip" by Liam Freeman, AnOther, November 3, 2015

"Exhibition Tracks an Artistic Couple's Latin American Influences" by Alice Rawsthorn, The New York Times, October 29, 2015

"Anni and Josef Albers and the Pleasure of Pre-Columbian Art" by Pac Pobric, The Art Newspaper, October 28, 2015

Josef Albers
Allusive, 1965
screenprint
sheet: 14 x 17 1/2 in. (35.6 x 44.5 cm)
1976.4.164

2016 Burlington, Vermont

Formulate/Articulate is presented in conjunction with AIGA Vermont Design Week and features vivid examples of Josef Albers's print and graphic work as well as related ephemera, including original screenprints from his seminal 1963 publication, Interaction of Color.

Josef Albers
Double Homage to the Square, 1957
oil on masonite
16 x 31 in. (40.6 x 78.7 cm)
1976.1.281
Josef Albers
Homage to the Square, 1959
oil on masonite
18 x 18 in. (45.7 x 45.7 cm)
1976.1.306
Josef Albers
Study for Homage to the Square, 1963
oil on masonite
16 x 16 in. (40.6 x 40.6 cm)
1976.1.155

2016 Madrid

Josef Albers: Homage to the Square is dedicated to the artist's most famous series of paintings, which he created from 1950 until his death in 1976. The Homage to the Square paintings share a basic geometric composition of squares within squares, and the variations, of which Albers made into the thousands, explore the mutability of color and its effects on perception. Of particular note in this exhibition is the unusual Double Homage to the Square, which pairs two paintings within one composition. Other works include studies and finished oil paintings from 1955 to 1965.

Josef Albers
Indicating Solids, 1971
oil on masonite
24 x 22 in. (61 x 55.9 cm)
1976.1.1053
Josef Albers
Study for Homage to the Square: Late Exchange, 1964
oil on masonite
24 x 24 in. (61 x 61 cm)
1976.1.616
Josef Albers
Treble Clef G, 1932–35
gouache on paper
14 7/8 x 10 15/16 in. (37.8 x 27.8 cm)
1976.2.206b
Josef Albers
Homage to the Square, 1962
oil on masonite
24 x 24 in. (61 x 61 cm)
1976.1.587
Josef Albers
Homage to the Square, n.d.
oil on masonite
16 x 16 in. (40.6 x 40.6 cm)
1976.1.14
Josef Albers
Untitled (Kinetic), 1945
oil on masonite
14 x 22 in. (35.6 x 55.9 cm)
1976.1.1045
Installation view, Josef Albers: Grey Steps, Grey Scales, Grey Ladders, David Zwirner Gallery, New York, 2016. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery
Installation view, Josef Albers: Grey Steps, Grey Scales, Grey Ladders, David Zwirner Gallery, New York, 2016. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery
Installation view, Josef Albers: Grey Steps, Grey Scales, Grey Ladders, David Zwirner Gallery, New York, 2016. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery
Installation view, Josef Albers: Grey Steps, Grey Scales, Grey Ladders, David Zwirner Gallery, New York, 2016. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery
Installation view, Josef Albers: Grey Steps, Grey Scales, Grey Ladders, David Zwirner Gallery, New York, 2016. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery
Installation view, Josef Albers: Grey Steps, Grey Scales, Grey Ladders, David Zwirner Gallery, New York, 2016. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery
Installation view, Josef Albers: Grey Steps, Grey Scales, Grey Ladders, David Zwirner Gallery, New York, 2016. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery
Installation view, Josef Albers: Grey Steps, Grey Scales, Grey Ladders, David Zwirner Gallery, New York, 2016. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery

2016 New York

The title Josef Albers: Grey Steps, Grey Scales, Grey Ladders is taken from a passage in Interaction of Color (1963), Albers's significant treatise on color studies and an essential handbook for artists and teachers. Particularly concerned with the study of chromatic interaction, in which visual perception of a color is affected by those adjacent to it, Albers writes, "To this end, we study gradation by producing so-called grey steps, grey scales, grey ladders. These demonstrate a gradual stepping up or down between white and black, between lighter and darker."

The centrality of these gradations between black, white, and grey to Albers's overall theory of color is demonstrated by the inclusion of his first Homage to the Square painting, Homage to the Square (A) (1950), which inaugurated the series that would occupy him until his death in 1976. Establishing the configuration of nested squares for which the series is known, the work moves progressively from deep black at its center to pale grey at its edge. In addition to this key painting and its related studies, the exhibition also presents a range of works in a variety of media that attest to Albers's lifelong investigation into black, white, and grey, from ink and watercolor works on paper that pre-date his time at the Bauhaus, to gouaches executed during his tenure at Black Mountain College, to color studies that shed light on his working process. Known primarily for his intensive exploration of color, Albers often utilized tones of black, white, and grey while working out new ideas and new techniques, crafting finely tuned studies of light and perception while emphasizing the graphic and rhythmic qualities of his compositions. Examples of this tendency include not only the first Homage to the Square, mentioned above, but also earlier works, among them his series of Treble Clefs (1932–35)—important gouaches that bridge the period from his departure from the Bauhaus to his arrival in America—and selections from his Kinetics series of the early 1940s.

Josef Albers
Study for Homage to the Square: Aurora, 1957
oil on masonite
24 x 24 in. (61 x 61 cm)
1976.1.1828
Josef Albers
Study for Homage to the Square, n.d.
oil and graphite on blotting paper
12 x 12 in. (30.5 x 30.5 cm)
1976.2.79
Josef Albers
Study for a Variant, ca. 1947
oil and graphite on blotting paper
9 1/2 x 12 in. (24.1 x 30.5 cm)
1976.2.273
Josef Albers
Study for Homage to the Square: 2 Grays between 2 Yellows, 1961
oil on masonite
22 x 22 in. (55.9 x 55.9 cm)
1976.1.63
Josef Albers
Study for Homage to the Square: Now, 1962
oil on masonite
24 x 24 in. (61 x 61 cm)
1976.1.65
Installation view, Josef Albers: Sunny Side Up, David Zwirner Gallery, London, 2017. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery
Installation view, Josef Albers: Sunny Side Up, David Zwirner Gallery, London, 2017. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery
Installation view, Josef Albers: Sunny Side Up, David Zwirner Gallery, London, 2017. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery
Installation view, Josef Albers: Sunny Side Up, David Zwirner Gallery, London, 2017. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery
Installation view, Josef Albers: Sunny Side Up, David Zwirner Gallery, London, 2017. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery

2017 London

Josef Albers: Sunny Side Up presents a trove of paintings over five decades in which yellow dominates, conveying the limitless expressive potential of color and light that characterizes Albers's practice as a whole. If there was any single inspirer of Josef Albers's embrace of color it was the German Romantic poet, Johann Wolfgang Goethe. As a young artist, Albers owned an early edition of Goethe's Theory of Color (1810) in which the poet wrote ". . . a strong yellow on lustrous silk . . . has a magnificent and noble effect. We also experience a very warm and cozy impression with yellow. Thus, in painting, too, it belongs among the luminous and active colors. . . . The eye is gladdened, the heart expands, the feelings are cheered, an immediate warmth seems to waft toward us."

Sunny Side Up brings a touch of that warmth, presenting a selection of the artist's iconic Homage to the Square paintings, begun in 1950 and elaborated on until his death in 1976. Exploring a variety of chromatic and perceptual effects, the Homage to the Square paintings serve as a sustained, serial investigation into rhythm, mood, and spatial movement within a carefully configured nested square format. Also on view are paintings from Albers's earlier Variant/Adobe series, as well as color studies and additional works on paper. The exhibition forms a pendant to David Zwirner's previous Albers exhibition in New York (November–December 2016), Josef Albers: Grey Scales, Grey Steps, Grey Ladders, which focused on the artist's use of black, white, and grey.