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1930 Dessau

1938 New York

1945 New York

Anni Albers
Necklace, ca. 1940
drain strainer and paper clips
length: 16 in. (40.6 cm), strainer: 3 in. (7.6 cm) diameter
1994.14.16

1946 New York

1949 Houston, Texas

1950 New York

1953 Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

1953 Urbana

1956 Manchester, New Hampshire

1961 Darmstadt

1964 Darmstadt

1966 Paris

1968 New York

1968 Stuttgart

[FULL TEXT FOR SUB HEADLINE] Württembergischer Kunstverein, 50 Jahre Bauhaus, 5 May–28 July 1968; Royal Academy of Arts, London, England, 21 September–27 October 1968; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, 30 November 1968–9 January 1969; Musée National d'Art Moderne, Paris, France, 2 April–22 June 1969; Ontario Art Gallery, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 6 December 1969–1 February 1970; Pasadena Art Museum, Pasadena, California, 16 March–26 April 1970; Museo de Bellas Artes, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1 September–10 October 1970; National Museum of Art, Tokyo, Japan, 6 February–21 March 1971; Fundación Juan March, Madrid, 8 June–16 July 1978

1969 Los Angeles

1970 Zürich

1971 Cambridge, Massachusetts

1973 Pomona, California

1976 Mönchengladbach

Anni Albers
Untitled, 1948
linen and cotton
16 1/2 × 19 1/2 in. (41.9 × 49.5 cm)
Museum of Modern Art, New York 200.50
Josef Albers
Mexican Chair B, ca. 1940
wood, leather
27 × 17 3/4 × 25 in. (68.6 × 45.1 × 63.5 cm)

1976 Raleigh, North Carolina

The survey exhibition Two Hundred Years of the Visual Arts in North Carolina included works by Anni and Josef Albers. From the catalogue: "In the early 1930s a major art phenomenon occurred in North Carolina: the establishment of Black Mountain College by a group headed by John Rice, classics professor from Rollins College in Florida. The ideas of Black Mountain College attracted Josef and Anni Albers and seventeen other Europeans, all experts in various fields. The interrelation of the fine arts, decorative arts, and science, with the combination of progressive American educational thought and Bauhaus philosophy, made Black Mountain College unique in America. The school ran its cycle cycle and closed in 1956."

"Notes on Twentieth-Century Decorative Arts in North Carolina"
Ben F. Williams and Michael W. Brantley

1980 New Orleans, Louisiana

1984 New York

1985 Basel

1985 Paris

1986 New York

1987 Annandale-on-Hudson, New York

1988 Dessau

1988 New York

1988 New York

1988 Philadelphia

1996 Milan

1998 Berlin

2000 Essen

2001 Basel

2001 Madrid

2002 Madrid

2005 Bristol, UK

2008 Northampton, Massachusetts

2009 Antwerp

2009 Berlin

2009 New York

2009 Weimar

2010 Barcelona

2010 Berlin

Installation view, The Jewel Thief,
The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College,
Saratoga Springs, NY
Installation view, The Jewel Thief,
The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College,
Saratoga Springs, NY
Anni Albers,
C, 1969
screenprint
Anni Albers,
Smyrna-Knüpfteppich, 1983
screenprint

2010 Saratoga Springs, NY

The Jewel Thief explores new ways to think about and experience abstract art. Using divergent forms of display, the exhibition focuses attention on art's intersection with the decorative and functional elements of architecture. Beginning in the museum's atrium, the exhibition continues into the large Wachenheim gallery, filling the space with a diverse range of artwork, including painting, sculpture, textiles, wallpaper, chandeliers, video, and photography. 

Artwork is presented through the lens of several opposing yet fluid categories that exist in our everyday lives, such as private and public, intimate and spectacular, and hot and cold, the exhibition explores how artworks negotiate the distance between these constantly shifting categories and how space affects this negotiation.


Discarding the notion that abstract works are devoid of content, The Jewel Thief maintains that beauty and pleasure in artworks are full of meaning. The exhibition draws parallels between questions and attitudes seen within individual artworks and various means of display our culture traditionally uses. Defining boundaries and edges determines how we understand the limit of an object and experience. The establishment of such definitions requires a kind of invention—a shared abstraction—that alters what is possible for us to do, think, and be. These abstractions lead to the building of fences—real lines being drawn around things—and to shared understandings about the distance required for personal space.

2011 Cambridge, Massachusetts

2012 London

2012 Salzburg

2012 Venice

Anni Albers
Double Impression III, 1978
photo offset
11 x 9 in. (28 x 22.9 cm)
1994.11.56
Josef Albers
Multiplex A, 1947
woodcut
16 1/2 x 12 1/2 in. (41.9 x 31.7 cm)
1976.4.120
Installation view, Black Mountain College: Shaping Craft and Design, Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, Utah State University, 25 August 2014–28 February 2015. Photo: Andrew McAllister

2013 Asheville, North Carolina

Black Mountain College: Shaping Craft and Design rethinks the Black Mountain College story through the lens of craft and design. From the Bauhaus workshop-model foundation introduced by Josef and Anni Albers in 1933, to forward-thinking designers like Alvin Lustig and Buckminster Fuller, who taught in the 1940s, to the early growth of the studio pottery movement in the 1950s, Black Mountain College played a significant role in shaping craft and design ideas and practices of the twentieth century. The exhibition features work by Anni and Josef Albers, Ruth Asawa, Karen Karnes, Lawrence Kocher, and Shoji Hamada, among many others, as well a loom from the weaving studio and textiles by students of Anni Albers.

Installation view, To Open Eyes
Works by Gunta Stölzl, Anni Albers
Photo by Philipp Ottendörfer
Anni Albers
Black White Gray, 1927/1964
Wallhanging
1927.12.1b
Anni Albers
Untitled, 1925
Wallhanging
1925.12.1

2013 Bielefeld

Art and Textiles from the Bauhaus to the Present celebrates Bielefeld's 800th anniversary as home to the linen weaving industry, Beginning with woven works based on paintings by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and fabric designs by Sonia Delaunay, one focus of the exhibition is on tapestries, fabric patterns, and designs by artists from the Bauhaus, especially by Anni Albers, whose work was greatly admired by Philip Johnson, the Kunsthalle Bielefeld's architect. The work of Bauhaus student, Benita Koch-Otte, who spent twenty years of her life as the director of the weaving department at the Bodelschwingh Foundation in Bielefeld is also a focus. The works on display range from textile works of art from the 1960s and 1970s, to works by contemporary artists who have rediscovered the "craft" of textiles for themselves, re-examining it and experimenting with new forms of expression.

Installation view. Mingai are you here?
Image courtesy of Pace London.
Josef Albers
Zelle/Tents, 1932
woodcut
1976.4.65
Josef Albers
Astatic, 1944
woodcut from plywood
17 1/2 x 11 1/8 in. (44.5 x 28.3 cm)
1976.4.116
Josef Albers
Above the Water, 1944
woodcut
1976.4.117
Josef Albers
Tlaloc, 1944
woodcut in rough pine board, 15 x 14 1/2 in. (38.1 x 36.8 cm)
1976.4.118

2013 London + New York

Mingei: Are You Here? explores the legacy of Mingei, a Japanese folk craft movement led by philosopher and critic Sōetsu Yanagi and questions the presence of craftsmanship in contemporary art. The exhibition features eighty works and special commissions by more than twenty-five artists, including paintings, sculptures, works on paper, ceramics and textile shown in a vitrine inspired by ethnographic exhibitions. Systems of display and practical aspects of museum work are one of the central themes of the exhibition. Curated by Nicolas Trembley, this exhibition juxtaposes historical works by Japanese Mingei artists with modern and contemporary artists, designers and architects inspired by the philosophy of Mingei.

2013 Mönchengladbach, Germany

2013 New York

2013 New York

20th-century design was profoundly shaped and enhanced by the creativity of women—as muses of modernity and shapers of new ways of living, and as designers, patrons, performers, and educators. This installation, drawn entirely from MoMA's collection, celebrates the diversity and vitality of individual artists' approach to the modern world, from Loïe Fuller's pulsating turn-of-the-century performances to April Greiman's 1980s computer-generated graphics, at the vanguard of early digital design. Highlights include the first display of a newly conserved kitchen by Charlotte Perriand with Le Corbusier (1952) from the Unité d'Habitation housing project; furniture and designs by Lilly Reich, Eileen Gray, Eva Zeisel, Ray Eames, Lella Vignelli, and Denise Scott Brown; textiles by Anni Albers and Eszter Haraszty; ceramics by Lucy Rie; a display of 1960s psychedelic concert posters by graphic designer Bonnie Maclean; and a never-before-seen selection of posters and graphic material from the punk era. The gallery's "graphics corner" first explores the changing role and visual imagery of the New Woman through a selection of posters created between 1890 and 1938; in April 2014 the focus of this section will shift to Women and War, an examination of the iconography and varied roles of women in times of conflict, in commemoration of the centennial of the outbreak of World War I.

Anni Albers
Wall Hanging, 1924
cotton and silk
1994.12.1
Anni Albers
With Verticals, 1946
cotton and linen
61 × 46.5 in. (154.9 × 118.1 cm)
2004.12.1
Anonymous
Andean textile fragment (Late Horizon)
1994.16.2
Andean textile fragment (Huari)
wool
8 3/4 x 4 5/8 in. (22.2 x 11.7 cm)
1994.16.6
Anonymous
Andean textile fragment (Huari or Early Chancay)
1994.16.74
Anonymous
Andean textile fragment (Inca or Late Horizon)
1994.16.96
Anonymous
Andean textile fragment (Late Horizon)
1994.16.97

2013 Paris

Focusing on carpets and tapestries by modern and contemporary artists, DECORUM includes, as well ancient and anonymous pieces and aims to create connections, uncover influences and provoke confrontations. The rugs and tapestries in the exhibition transcend the usual boundaries between decorative, applied, and fine arts, always oscillating between traditional and radical forms.

Installation view, Kunst & Textil
Anni Albers, Epitaph, 1968
Center wall
Installation view, Kunst & Textil
Anni Albers, Black-White-Gold I, 1950
Center–top, near wall
Anni Albers
Two, 1952
linen, cotton, rayon
18 1/2 x 40 1/4 in. (47 x 102.2 cm)
1996.12.3
Anni Albers
Black-White-Gold I, 1950
1996.12.1
Anni Albers
La Luz I, 1947
linen and metallic thread
18 1/2 × 32 1/2 in. (47 × 82.5 cm)
1994.12.2
Anni Albers
Epitaph, 1968
2005.12.1
Anonymous
Andean textile fragment (Chancay)
1994.16.21

2013 Wolfsburg + Stuttgart

Art and Textiles includes more than 200 works by both well-known artists such as Gustav Klimt, Vincent van Gogh, Edgar Degas, Henri Matisse, Paul Klee, and Jackson Pollock as well as works whose creators' remain nameless as, for example, a pre-Columbian textile fragment from the collection of Anni Albers. it explores the significance of textiles in a kind of "re-reading" of the history of modern art from Art Nouveau to the present. The modern separation of applied and fine art resulted in the systematic, decades-long exclusion of all handicrafts from the art historical canon. In the process, modernism drew decisive impulses from the ties between art and craftsmanship.

Anni Albers
Orchestra III wall hanging for AT&T building, 1984
wool
98 × 93 in. (243.8 × 236.2 cm)
2005.22.3

2014 Brooklyn

Black Mountain Art: An Interdisciplinary Approach acts as companion exhibition to, and contextualizes the performance of, Black Mountain Songs. Through physical examples of work by Black Mountain College faculty and alumni, including Anni Albers, the exhibition seeks to illuminate the experimental nature of Black Mountain College.

Anni Albers
Typewriter study, n.d.
typewriter printing in black ink on paper
10 5/8 x 6 5/8 in. (27 x 16.8 cm)
1994.18.7
Anni Albers
Exercise in textile effects in perforated paper, n.d.
perforated paper mounted on board
10 5/8 x 6 5/8 in. (27 x 16.7 cm)
1994.18.8

2014 London

Abstract Drawing, organized by Richard Deacon, is the Drawing Room's fourth artist-curated exhibition. Featuring work by international artists from different generations—including Anni Albers—the exhibition explores the idea of abstraction in drawing. Richard Deacon writes: "This exhibition has no ambitions to be a universal survey, but in selecting a show around the idea of abstract drawing, these various strands—inscriptive, calligraphic, ornamental, generative, individuating, and identifying—have all featured. In recalling that very old piece of ochre something else also becomes clear. The mark invents the object and makes it real."

Anni Albers
Tikal, 1958
cotton
30 x 23 in. (76.2 x 58.4 cm)
Museum of Arts and Design, New York 1979.3.5

2014 New York

What Would Mrs. Webb Do? A Founder's Vision celebrates the enduring legacy of Aileen Osborn Webb, the founder of the Museum of Arts and Design. As a patron and philanthropist, Webb pioneered an understanding of craftsmanship and the handmade as a creative driving force behind art and design. The first half of the exhibition features work by American makers from the 1950s to the late 1960s whose practice directly benefitted from the support of Webb and others who shared her vision, while highlighting the many crafts-related institutions that Webb launched. The exhibition includes groundbreaking works by early masters such as Anni Albers, Wharton Esherick, and Harvey Littleton, as well as new creations by Joris Laarman, Judith Schaechter, and Hiroshi Suzuki, among others.

Anni Albers
Black White Gray, 1927/1964
cotton and silk
58 1/4 × 47 3/4 in. (147.9 × 121.3 cm)

2014 New York

Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor is the first large-scale survey of Robert Gober's career to take place in the United States. Gober (American, b. 1954) rose to prominence in the mid–1980s and was quickly acknowledged as one of the most significant artists of his generation. Early in his career he made deceptively simple sculptures of everyday objects—beginning with sinks before moving on to domestic furniture such as playpens, beds, and doors. In the 1990s, his practice evolved from single works to theatrical room-sized environments. The loosely chronological presentation traces the development of this remarkable body of work, highlighting themes and motifs that emerged in the early 1980s and continue to inform Gober's work today. The exhibition features around 130 works across several mediums, together with selections from the artist's collection and works by other artists, including Anni Albers.

Josef Albers
Album cover for Terry Snyder and the All Stars, Persuasive Percussion,1959
lithograph
Josef Albers
Album cover for Enoch Light and the Light Brigade, Provocative Percussion,1959
lithograph
Josef Albers
Album cover for Enoch Light and the Light Brigade, Provocative Percussion vol. 2,1960
lithograph

2014 New York

Making Music Modern: Design for Ear and Eye gathers designs for auditoriums, instruments, and equipment for listening to music, along with posters, record sleeves, sheet music, and animation. The exhibition examines alternative music cultures of the early 20th century, the rise of radio during the interwar period, how design shaped the "cool" aesthetic of midcentury jazz and hi-fidelity culture, and its role in countercultural music scenes from pop to punk, and later 20th-century design explorations at the intersection of art, technology, and perception.

Anni Albers
Untitled, 1941
rayon, linen, cotton, wool, jute
21 × 46 in. (53.3 × 116.8 cm)
2012.12.1
Anni Albers
Study in textile appearance through imitation in corrugated paper, n.d.
corrugated paper, black ink, white gouache
3 1/2 × 2 1/4 in. (8.8 × 5.7 cm)
1994-18-3-detail
Anni Albers
Typewriter study to create textile effect, n.d.
ink on paper mounted on board
10 5/8 × 6 3/4 in. (26.9 × 17.1 cm)
1994.18.7
Josef Albers
Untitled (Teopanzolco, Mexico), ca. 1936–39
photograph
7 x 9 7/8 in. (17.7 x 25 cm)
1976.7.454
Josef Albers
Walls around the patio of Teotihuacan, Mexico, n.d.
photograph
7 x 9 7/8 in. (17.7 x 25 cm)
1976.7.457

2015 Berlin

Black Mountain: An Interdisciplinary Experiment 1933–1957 is the first exhibition in a German museum to examine the legendary American art college near Asheville, North Carolina. Black Mountain was conceived as an interdisciplinary and above all experimental college that promoted collaboration. At the recommendation of architect Philip Johnson, Bauhaus teacher Josef Albers was appointed artistic director. Thanks to the commitment of Josef and Anni Albers and of other emigrants from Germany who taught at Black Mountain, the college profited from the educational principles and practical, applied-arts orientation of the Bauhaus and from the academic and artistic achievements of European modernism. The exhibition offers a historical retrospective on Black Mountain and further considers its influence, highlighting current debates on the education and training of artists today. Featured artists include Anni and Josef Albers, Hazel Larsen Archer, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Buckminster Fuller, and Elaine and Willem de Kooning, among others.

Installation view, Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College, 1933–1957, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, 2016. Photo: Brian Forrest. Courtesy of Hammer Museum
Josef Albers
Leaf Study IX, ca. 1940
leaves, colored paper, adhesive
28 × 24 3/4 in. (71.1 × 62.9 cm)
1976.9.4
Anni Albers
Knot, 1947
gouache on paper
17 × 20 in. (43.2 × 51 cm)
1994.10.3
Josef Albers
Multiplex A, 1947
woodcut
16 1/2 x 12 1/2 in. (41.9 x 31.7 cm)
1976.4.120
Anni Albers
With Verticals, 1946
cotton and linen
61 × 46.5 in. (154.9 × 118.1 cm)
2004.12.1
Anni Albers
La Luz I, 1947
linen and metallic thread
18 1/2 × 32 1/2 in. (47 × 82.5 cm)
1994.12.2
Anni Albers
Necklace, ca. 1940
drain strainer and paper clips
length: 16 in. (40.6 cm), strainer: 3 in. (7.6 cm) diameter
1994.14.16
Josef Albers
Astatic, 1944
woodcut from plywood
17 1/2 x 11 1/8 in. (44.5 x 28.3 cm)
1976.4.116
Josef Albers
Variant / Adobe, 1947–52
oil on masonite
14 x 27 in. (35.6 x 68.6 cm)
1976.1.1161

2015 Boston + Los Angeles + Columbus

Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College, 1933–1957 features individual works by over fifty artists, an acoustic soundscape, examples of student work, archival documents such as class notebooks and exams, documentary photographs of life at the college, and contemporary magazine and newspaper coverage of the college. This exhibition offers new insights into the history of Black Mountain College and its lasting influence on contemporary endeavors in art education, radical pedagogy, collectivism, and experimental artistic practice.

In the history of Black Mountain College no decision was more important or more fateful than John Andrew Rice's invitation to Josef Albers to teach in North Carolina. The Alberses brought with them an ineluctable mix of new ideas about art, learned, taught, and perfected at the Bauhaus, as well as a distinctly old-world sensibility about culture and the crucial and transformative role it played in society. These two seemingly contradictory aspects of the Alberses' gift would permanently shape the character of the College and, though they could not have known it at the time, it would lay the groundwork for the development of both art and art schools in America during the second half of the century. The second room of the exhibition is dedicated entirely to the work of Anni and Josef Albers in acknowledgement of their centrality to the Black Mountain College story.

Reviews

"Learn By Painting" by Louis Menand, The New Yorker, October 27, 2015

Anni Albers
Study for DO I, 1973
gouache on paper
19 x 15 1/8 in. (48.26 x 43.5 cm)
1994.10.42

2015 Brooklyn

Fiber Optic, highlights several generations of artists working at the intersection of geometry and fiber. The exhibition features works by fifteen artists from across the country, including Anni Albers, Joell Baxter, Samantha Bittman, Chris Bogia, Martha Clippinger, Gabriel Dawe, Michelle Grabner, Lynne Harlow, Linda King Ferguson, Victoria Munro, Gabriel Pionkowski, Carrie Pollack, Sue Ravitz, Stephen Westfall, and Emi Winter.

Over the past decade, there has been a strong resurgence of interest among contemporary artists in traditional forms associated with fiber and textiles. Fiber Optic features geometric, patterned, and color-based work across a wide array of media, including weaving, needlepoint, photography, painting, print, sculpture, and installation. As a spiritual and material touchstone for many of the participating artists, the exhibition begins with a single, patterned gouache on paper study by the late, legendary Bauhaus artist and weaver Anni Albers (1899–1994).

Installation view, Stitch in Time: The Fabric of Contemporary Life, Lewis Glucksman Gallery, 2015. Photo: Tomas Tyner. Courtesy of University College Cork
Installation view, Stitch in Time: The Fabric of Contemporary Life, Lewis Glucksman Gallery, 2015. Photo: Tomas Tyner. Courtesy of University College Cork
Installation view, Stitch in Time: The Fabric of Contemporary Life, Lewis Glucksman Gallery, 2015. Photo: Tomas Tyner. Courtesy of University College Cork
Anni Albers
Orchestra wall hanging for AT&T building, 1984
wool
98 x 89 in. (243.8 × 226 cm)
2005.22.1
Anni Albers
Orchestra II wall hanging for AT&T building, 1984
wool
98 x 89 in. (243.8 x 226 cm)
2005.22.2
Anni Albers
Orchestra III wall hanging for AT&T building, 1984
wool
98 × 93 in. (243.8 × 236.2 cm)
2005.22.3
Anni Albers
Floating wall hanging for AT&T building, 1984
wool
98 × 93 in. (243.8 × 236.2 cm)
2005.22.4

2015 Cork, Ireland

Stitch in Time: The Fabric of Contemporary Life looks at the ways in which artists have used traditional textile mediums to explore ideas of gender, community, labor and race. Presenting works by Irish and international artists, the exhibition reveals how woven designs have been created to link conventional craft with radical expressions of identity. From protest banners to embroidered passports, abstract fabric designs to narrative tapestries, Stitch in Time demonstrates how artists employ textiles and its associations of a popular, vernacular culture to shape and comment on contemporary life. Featured artists include Anni Albers, Sarah Browne, Jeremy Deller, Sissi Farassat, Angela Fulcher, Grayson Perry, and Slavs and Tatars.

Anni Albers
Black White Yellow, 1926/1967
silk and rayon
80 × 47 in. (203 × 119 cm)
Victoria and Albert Museum 534-1968

2015 London

Adventures of the Black Square: Abstract Art and Society 1915–2015 brings together over 100 works by 80 modern masters and contemporary artists including Anni Albers, Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, Piet Mondrian, Gabriel Orozco, and Aleksander Rodchenko. The exhibition traces a century of abstract art from 1915 to today, shedding new light on the evolution of geometric abstraction. Highlights include photographs documenting the radio towers of Moscow and Berlin by Aleksandr Rodchenko and László Moholy–Nagy, archival images of iconic exhibitions running through the history of abstraction, and a selection of magazines which convey revolutionary ideas in art and society through typography and graphic design.

Anni Albers
Study for DO II, 1973
gouache on blueprint paper
19 5/8 x 16 7/8 in. (49.9 x 42.9 cm)
1994.10.43

2015 New York

Common Thread celebrates the expansive potential of abstract painting and its relationship to and reliance on textiles. Two pieces set the historical and political stage for the exhibition: an Anni Albers study and an Ellen Lesperance gouache knitting pattern of a sweater that Anni Albers (née Fleischmann) wore a year before meeting Josef Albers. The grid, a basic ruling principle of the Bauhaus where Anni Albers studied weaving, is the dominant visual force in her study. Lesperance, in turn, deconstructs Albers's sweater into a geometric grid pattern. The exhibition features paintings by Wendy Edwards, Tamara Gonzales, Michelle Grabner, Sarah Harrison, Danielle Mysliwiec, Sasha Pierce, Angela Teng, Leslie Wayne, and Summer Wheat. All of the artists address the fluidity of gendered territories and eschew the "iconic brushstroke" in favor of fiber art's poetic possibilities.

Anni Albers
Yellow Meander, 1970
screenprint
28 x 24 in. (71.1 x 61 cm)
1994.11.16
Anni Albers
Blue Meander, 1970
screenprint
28 x 24 in. (71 x 61 cm)
1994.11.14
Anni Albers
Red Meander II, 1970–71
screenprint
28 x 24 in. (71.1 x 61 cm)
1994.11.17
Anni Albers
Orange Meander, 1970
screenprint
28 x 24 in. (71.1 x 61 cm)
1994.11.15

2015 New York + Washington, D.C.

Pathmakers: Women in Art, Craft and Design, Midcentury and Today considers the important contributions of women to modernism in postwar visual culture. In the 1950s and 1960s, an era when painting, sculpture, and architecture were dominated by men, women had considerable impact in alternative materials such as textiles, ceramics, and metals. Largely unexamined in major art historical surveys, either due to their gender or choice of materials, these pioneering women achieved success and international recognition, establishing a model of professional identity for future generations of women.

Featuring more than 100 works, Pathmakers focuses on a core cadre of women—including Ruth Asawa, Edith Heath, Sheila Hicks, Karen Karnes, Dorothy Liebes, Alice Kagawa Parrott, Toshiko Takaezu, Lenore Tawney, and Eva Zeisel—who had impact and influence as designers, artists, and teachers. The exhibition also highlights contributions of European émigrés, including Anni Albers and Maija Grotell, who brought with them a conviction that craft could serve as a pathway to modernist innovation. The legacy of these women is conveyed through a section of the exhibition that presents works by contemporary female artists and designers, including Polly Apfelbaum, Vivian Beer, Front Design, Christine McHorse, Michelle Grabner, Hella Jongerius, Gabriel A. Maher, Magdalene Odundo, and Anne Wilson.

Anni Albers
Orange Meander, 1970
screenprint
28 x 24 in. (71.1 x 61 cm)
1994.11.15
Anni Albers
Yellow Meander, 1970
screenprint
28 x 24 in. (71.1 x 61 cm)
1994.11.16
Anni Albers
Camino Real, 1969
screenprint
23 1/2 x 22 in. (59.7 x 55.9 cm)
1994.11.6
Installation view, Interwoven: Prints and Process, Richard and Dolly Maass Gallery, Purchase College, 2015. Photo: Rebecca Wall

2015 Purchase, New York

Interwoven: Prints and Process considers the work of artists who experiment with and interweave elements of abstraction, repetition, and color in their printmaking. Featured artists include Anni Albers, Polly Apfelbaum, Ann Aspinwall, Joell Baxter, Louisiana Bendolph, Sanford Biggers, Willie Cole, Stella Ebner, Elana Herzog, Emil Luks, and Richard Tuttle.

Anni Albers
Red and Blue Layers, 1954
cotton
24 1/4 × 14 3/4 in. (61.6 × 37.8 cm)
1998.12.1
Anni Albers
Wallhanging, 1924
cotton and silk
66 1/4 × 39 1/2 in. (168.3 × 100.3 cm)
1994.12.1
Anni Albers
Study for Camino Real, 1967
gouache on graph paper
17 1/2 × 16 in. (44.4 × 40.6 cm)
1994.10.22
Anni Albers
Knot 2, 1947
gouache on paper
10 × 13 3/4 in. (25.4 × 34.9 cm)
1947.10.1
Anni Albers
Design, ca. 1955
gouache on photostat paper
7 1/8 × 17 3/4 in. (18 × 45 cm)
1994.10.9
Anni Albers
Study in red stripes, 1969
gouache on blueprint paper
22 × 17 in. (56 × 43.5 cm)
1994.10.31
Anni Albers
Knot 3, 1947
watercolor on paper
16 1/2 x 19 3/4 in. (42 x 50 cm
1994.10.4

2015 Reykjavik

Textile Art by Júlíana Sveinsdóttur and Anni Albers: Vertical/Horizontal considers the work of the prominent pioneer artist Júlíana Sveinsdóttir (1889–1966). In parallel with her painting career, Sveinsdóttir enjoyed a successful and interesting career as a textile artist. Her textiles are shown here alongside the works of the German Bauhaus weaver/artist Anni Albers, who was one of the most influential weavers of the twentieth century. Both Júlíana and Anni took up weaving by chance and instead of being limited by the traditional technique, the artists discovered freedom to experiment with conventional and unconventional materials, weaving forms and compositions that were abstract and modern. The exhibition commemorates the centenary of Icelandic women gaining the right to vote.

Anni Albers
Study for DO II, 1973
gouache on blueprint paper
18 1/4 × 18 1/2 in. (46.3 × 47 cm)
1994.10.44
Josef Albers
Park, ca. 1923
glass, metal, wire, and paint
19 1/2 × 15 in. (49.5 × 38.1 cm)
1992.6.28

2015 Weil am Rhein, Germany

Bauhaus: Design is a major exhibition presenting a comprehensive overview of the Bauhaus concept of design. The Bauhaus was one of the most influential cultural institutions of the twentieth century, a place where the leading tendencies of the European avant-garde converged and melded. Stylized into a myth, the Bauhaus also came to epitomize the modern design cliché: geometric, industrial, cool. Bauhaus: Design presents a multiplicity of rare, in some cases never-before-seen works from the fields of design, architecture, art, film, and photography, and documents underlying developmental processes and societal models. At the same time, the exhibition considers the influence of the Bauhaus as it relates to current developments in design, such as the digital revolution, and features works by contemporary designers and artists. Viewed from this present-day perspective, the Bauhaus reveals an array of new facets with surprising contemporary relevance. Featured designers and artists include Josef and Anni Albers, Marianne Brandt, Marcel Breuer, Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, Lyonel Feininger, Joseph Grima, Walter Gropius, Enzo Mari, Olaf Nicolai, Open Desk, Adrian Sauer, Oskar Schlemmer, among many others.

Installation view, Albers and the Bauhaus, Stephen Friedman Gallery, 2016. Courtesy of Stephen Friedman Gallery
Installation view, Albers and the Bauhaus, Stephen Friedman Gallery, 2016. Courtesy of Stephen Friedman Gallery
Installation view, Albers and the Bauhaus, Stephen Friedman Gallery, 2016. Courtesy of Stephen Friedman Gallery
Installation view, Albers and the Bauhaus, Stephen Friedman Gallery, 2016. Courtesy of Stephen Friedman Gallery
Josef Albers
City, 1928/1936
tempera on masonite
11 5/8 x 22 1/8 in. (27.9 x 55.9 cm)
1976.1.1365
Josef Albers
Tea glass with saucer and stirrer, 1925
heat resistant glass, chrome-plated steel, ebony, porcelain
Glass: 2 1/4 × 3 1/2 in. (5.7 × 8.9 cm)
Saucer: 4 1/4 in. (10.5 cm) diameter
Stirrer: 4 × 1/2 in. (10.3 × 1.1 cm)
2010.17.1
Josef Albers
Variant / Adobe, 1948
oil and graphite on blotting paper
17 3/4 x 21 7/8 in. (45.1 x 55.6 cm)
1976.2.113
Anni Albers
Study for DO I, 1973
gouache on paper
19 x 15 1/8 in. (48.26 x 43.5 cm)
1994.10.42
Anni Albers
Study for DO II, 1973
gouache on blueprint paper
19 5/8 x 16 7/8 in. (49.9 x 42.9 cm)
1994.10.43

2016 London

Albers and the Bauhaus brings together design and art from the Bauhaus in the most comprehensive display of such material at a commercial gallery to date. Furniture and objects by Marianne Brandt, Marcel Breuer, and Otto Lindig tell the story of this unique and short-lived incubator, which helped create some of the most influential architects, designers, and artists of the twentieth century. A special focus of the exhibition is Josef Albers's creative output at the Bauhaus. Archival materials, paintings, drawings, and glassworks chart his significant contribution to the moment. In Albers's work from the 1920s, we witness the first sure steps of modernism. Blurring the boundaries between art and design, these works prefigure and begin to define some of the hallmarks of his later practice. Nearly one hundred years after its inception, the Bauhaus principles and its protagonists have an enduring influence over how we live, see art, and view the world around us.

Anni Albers
Necklace, ca. 1940
rubber rings (orange) on cream-colored grosgrain ribbon
36 1/2 in. (92.7 cm)
2006.14.7
Anni Albers
Necklace, ca. 1940
plastic rings on black grosgrain ribbon
58 3/4 in. (149.2 cm)
2006.14.6
Anni Albers
Knot 2, 1947
gouache on paper
10 × 13 3/4 in. (25.4 × 34.9 cm)
1947.10.1
Anni Albers
Open Letter, 1958
cotton
23 × 24 in. (58.4 × 61 cm)
1994.12.4
Installation view, Making and Unmaking, an exhibition curated by Duro Olowu, Camden Arts Centre, London, 2016. Photo: Mark Blower. Courtesy of Camden Arts Centre
Installation view, Making and Unmaking, an exhibition curated by Duro Olowu, Camden Arts Centre, London, 2016. Photo: Mark Blower. Courtesy of Camden Arts Centre
Installation view, Making and Unmaking, an exhibition curated by Duro Olowu, Camden Arts Centre, London, 2016. Photo: Mark Blower. Courtesy of Camden Arts Centre

2016 London

Making and Unmaking, organized by the artist Duro Olowu and comprising painting, sculpture, fabric, photography, objects, and video, traces geographical movements and the legacies associated with cloth and pattern, with a particular focus on European and West African aesthetics. The exhibition features colorful and formal compositions alongside representations of costume and the body in portraiture. Historical pieces and works by artists such as Anni Albers are presented together with new works by contemporary artists including Hurvin Anderson, Polly Apfelbaum, David Hammons, Glenn Ligon, Brice Marden, and Wangechi Mutu, among others.

Anni Albers
Study for unexecuted wallhanging, 1926
gouache with pencil on photo offset paper
15 x 9 3/4 in. (38.1 x 24.7 cm)
1994.10.1
Anni Albers
Wallhanging, 1924
cotton and silk
66 1/4 × 39 1/2 in. (168.3 × 100.3 cm)
1994.12.1
Josef Albers
Aufwärts (Upward), ca. 1926
sandblasted flashed glass with black paint
1976.6.2
Josef Albers
Design for a universal typeface, ca. 1926
ink and pencil on paper
8 5/16 x 11 3/4 in. (21.1 x 29.8 cm)
1976.3.124

2016 Paris

L'Esprit du Bauhaus traces the periods and forms of art that forged the Bauhaus spirit: the Middle Ages and the construction of cathedrals, the arts of the Asian and Islamic worlds, and the British Arts and Crafts movement that abolished the frontiers between art and craftsmanship. From 1919 to 1933, in Weimar, Dessau, and Berlin, the Bauhaus established a new kind of school where painters, architects, artisans, engineers, actors, musicians, photographers, and designers worked together to forge a new concept of daily living through a synthesis of the visual arts, craftsmanship, and industry. The Musée des Arts Décoratifs is paying tribute to this spirit of invention, freedom, creation, and the passing on of knowledge and skills that the great artists, architects, and designers who taught and studied at the Bauhaus went on to propagate throughout the twentieth century. Featured works include historic Bauhaus pieces, together with contemporary counterparts including works by Székély, Matthieu Mercier, Karen Bisch, Sheila Hicks, and Ulla von Brandenburg.

Anni Albers
Line Involvement II, 1964
lithograph
14 3/4 × 19 3/4 in. (37.4 × 50.5 cm)
1994.11.5.b

2016 Philadelphia

Breaking Ground reveals the ways in which artists in the 1940s and 1950s pushed the boundaries of printmaking. Through a selection of prints as well as ceramics, textile, and sculpture—all drawn from the Museum's collection—this exhibition conveys the vibrant spirit and extraordinary growth of the arts during these decades. Among the artists represented are influential figures Anni Albers, Antonio Frasconi, Stanley William Hayter, Alice Trumbull Mason, Gabor Peterdi, Robert Rauschenberg, and June Wayne.

Anni Albers
Black White Gray, 1927/1964
cotton and silk
58 1/4 × 47 3/4 in. (148 x 121.3 cm)

2017 Berlin

In the Carpet investigates exchanges between centers in Europe and in Morocco with the mutual influences between the practices of art and craft. The exhibition addresses stories with multiple time frames, from the Bauhaus to now, and unveils the resonances between traditional Berber carpets and contemporary art. The narration starts with the emblematic figure of Sheila Hicks who traveled to Morocco in the early 1970s to encounter traditional weaving practices. Historical pieces are exhibited as a testimony of the formal dialogue between Berber carpets (Zemmour and Béni Ourarain) and the Bauhaus figures of Anni Albers and Gunta Stölzl. Also featured is the Group of "L'Ecole de Casablanca," including the artwork of founding member Mohammed Melehi. Created in 1964, the Group of L'Ecole de Casablanca defines an aesthetic language liberated from a euro-centered art history by drawing its inspiration from the plural histories and cultures of Morocco. The exhibition engages with the polysemous definitions of carpets—object and representation, physical and mental space, territory, form and technique, gesture and performance, such as: Souvenir: la lecon de géométrie, 2015, created by Saâdane Afif. These works highlight the complex phenomena of superposition or fusion, the exchanges between cultures and countries and underline the overlaps between contemporary art and traditional practices.