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Josef Albers
Homage to the Square: Post Autumn, 1963
oil on masonite
40 x 40 in. (101.6 x 101.6 cm)
Private collection

2017 Sheffield, United Kingdom

Going Public: The Kirkland Collection is part of the exhibition series Going Public: International Art Collectors in Sheffield. Reflecting a passion for photography, minimalism, and geometric abstraction, Jack Kirkland's personal collection brings together work by some of the most important artists of the past seventy-five years. The exhibition showcases personally selected highlights from the collection, including painting, sculpture, works on paper, and photography by artists such as Carl Andre, Donald Judd, Josef and Anni Albers, Bridget Riley, and Lewis Baltz, among others.

Josef Albers
Angular, 1935
oil on composition board
16 × 19 3/4 in. (40.6 x 50.2 cm)
2003.1.1
Josef Albers
Familiar Front, 1948–52
oil on masonite
13 3/4 x 21 in. (33 x 53.3 cm)
1976.1.1383
Josef Albers
Oscillating (C), 1940-45
oil on masonite
27 x 24 in. (68.6 x 61 cm)
1976.1.1367

2017 Savannah, Georgia

Jacob Lawrence: Lines of Influence is a group exhibition commemorating the centennial celebration of the birth of acclaimed painter, storyteller, educator, and chronicler of the mid–twentieth–century African American experience, Jacob Lawrence. The exhibition features a diverse selection of historical and contemporary artists in a multifaceted experience spanning three galleries within the museum. The curatorial approach emphasizes a contextually rich and widespread ground for the reading of Lawrence's work. During his lifetime, Lawrence occupied an interstitial position in the art world. He was considered both an insider and outsider, caught in a racially divided environment and edged to the margins of American modernism despite significant early exhibitions at renowned institutions such as the Museum of Modern Art and features in national press outlets. This exhibition makes strides to unravel such categorizations.

Featured artists include Josef Albers, Richmond Barthé, Romare Bearden, Sanford Biggers, José Clemente Orozco, Stuart Davis, George Grosz, Marsden Hartley, Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence, Horace Pippin, Faith Ringgold, Diego Rivera, Augusta Savage, and Kara Walker among others.

Josef Albers
Leaf Study V, ca. 1940
leaves, colored paper, adhesive
27 × 28 3/8 in. (68.6 × 72 cm)
1976.9.6
Anni Albers
Black-White-Gold I, 1950
cotton, lurex, jute
25 x 19 in. (63.8 x 48.3 cm)
1996.12.1

2017 New York

Josef and Anni and Ruth and Ray is the inaugural exhibition in David Zwirner's new location at 34 East 69th Street in New York City. Featuring work by Josef Albers, Anni Albers, Ruth Asawa, and Ray Johnson—all of whom were at Black Mountain College in North Carolina in the late 1940s—this exhibition explores both the aesthetic and personal dialogue among these artists during their Black Mountain years and beyond; and includes a number of works exchanged within the group, in addition to a selection of key compositions influenced by their time there. The influence of Josef and Anni Albers is especially visible in Asawa's and Johnson's works from the period, a number of which are featured. For example, in a painting on paper from around 1946 to 1949 inscribed and given to Anni Albers, Asawa uses subtle modifications in color and form to create a sense of depth and motion within the otherwise flat picture plane. Similarly in a rare figurative composition by Johnson from 1946, watercolor shapes and colors overlap and coalesce to form an abstracted portrait of Asawa, later given to her.

Other highlights from the exhibition includes two vibrant Leaf Studies by Josef Albers made by adhering leaves from Black Mountain's environs (a motif also used by Asawa) to colored paper; Asawa's first looped-wire sculpture from 1949; a group of Moticos by Johnson sent to Asawa in San Francisco; and a Pictorial Weaving by Anni Albers from 1950. A selection of archival materials, including photographs from Black Mountain College and letters exchanged among the artists are also included. These materials are drawn from the collections of The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, The Ruth Asawa Papers at Stanford University and the Asawa family, and the Estate of Ray Johnson.

Anni Albers in her weaving studio at Black Mountain College, 1937. Photo: Helen M. Post
Anni Albers
Untitled, ca. 1948
gouache on paper
13 3/4 x 10 3/4 in. (34.9 x 27.3 cm)
1994.10.8
Anni Albers
Two, 1952
linen, cotton, rayon
18 1/2 x 40 1/4 in. (47 x 102.2 cm)
1996.12.3
Anni Albers
Red and Blue Layers, 1954
cotton
24 1/4 × 14 3/4 in. (61.6 × 37.8 cm)
1998.12.1
Anni Albers
Drawing for a Rug II, 1959
gouache on paper
5 1/8 x 17 7/16 in. (13 x 44.3 cm)
1994.10.15
Anni Albers
Knot, 1947
gouache on paper
17 × 20 in. (43.2 × 51 cm)
1994.10.3
Anni Albers
Untitled, 1941
rayon, linen, cotton, wool, jute
21 × 46 in. (53.3 × 116.8 cm)
2012.12.1
Anni Albers
Epitaph, 1968
59 x 23 in. (149.9 x 58.4 cm)
2005.12.1

2017 Bilbao, Spain

Anni Albers: Touching Vision presents a focused survey of the artist's key series over six decades of work, from her Bauhaus years to the late 1970s. Best known for her pioneering role in the field of textile or fiber art, her innovative treatment of warp and weft, and her constant quest for new patterns and uses of fabric, Albers was instrumental in redefining the artist as a designer. Her art was inspired by pre-Columbian folklore and modern industry, yet unhampered by conventional notions of craftsmanship and gender-specific labor. Albers studied at the Bauhaus in Weimar, where she met her husband, the painter Josef Albers, and eventually directed the weaving workshop in 1931. After the institution was closed by the Nazi party in 1933, Albers and her husband moved to North Carolina, where they were both hired to teach at a free-form school that would become a benchmark of modern American art, Black Mountain College. There Albers continued to combine her educational activity with artistic experimentation, while also authoring what are now considered seminal texts in the history of contemporary textile art. The exhibition reveals affinities and unifying threads that illustrate the influence and continued relevance of this unique artist's ideas. A selection of writings by the artist, translated for the first time into Spanish, is being published as a companion to the exhibition.

Josef Albers
Study for Homage to the Square, 1965
oil on masonite
24 x 24 in. (60.9 x 60.9 cm)
1976.1.586

2017 London + Düsseldorf

Monochrome: Painting in Black and White investigates where and when grisaille painting was used and to what effect: from early religious works to paintings that emulate sculpture or respond to other media such as printmaking, photography, and film. Comprising works on glass, vellum, ceramic, silk, wood, and canvas from the Renaissance to today by artists such as Leonardo, Rembrandt, Degas, Picasso, Josef Albers, and Gerhard Richter, Monochrome encourages visitors to trace the fascinating but little-studied history of black-and-white painting.

Josef Albers
Untitled (Maya Temple, Chichen Itza, Mexico), ca. 1940
gelatin silver print
sheet: 5 1/8 x 6 15/16 in. (13 x 17.6 cm)
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

2017 New York

Josef Albers in Latin America brings together the artist's photographs and photo collages from the Guggenheim's collection and various lenders. These works, many of which have never been exhibited publicly, suggest a nuanced relationship between the forms and motifs of pre-Columbian monuments and the artist's iconic abstract canvases.

Albers's innovative approach to photography remains an underappreciated aspect of his career. On his first trip to Mexico, in 1935, Albers encountered the magnificent architecture of ancient Mesoamerica. He later remarked in a letter to Vasily Kandinsky, a former colleague at the Bauhaus, "Mexico is truly the promised land of abstract art." With his wife, artist Anni Albers, Josef visited Mexico and other Latin American countries nearly a dozen times from 1935 to 1967. They saw numerous archeological sites and monuments, especially in Mexico and Peru. On each visit, Josef took hundreds of black-and-white photographs of the pyramids, shrines, and sanctuaries at these sites, often grouping multiple images printed at various scales onto eight by ten inch sheets.

Albers's experiences in Latin America offer an essential context for understanding his paintings and prints, particularly from his Homage to the Square and Variant/Adobe series, examples of which are featured in this show.

2018 Düsseldorf + London