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Josef Albers
I-S Va 6, 1969
from the portfolio Six Variants
screenprint
sheet: 28 x 36 in. (71.1 x 91.4 cm)

2016 Zurich

Max Peiffer Watenphul and His Companions presents paintings by the artist alongside works by contemporaries including Josef Albers, Umberto Boccioni, Marc Chagall, Natalia Goncharova, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, and Xanti Schawinsky, among many others.

Hermès Editeur 1: Hommage au Carré by Josef Albers
© Hermès © The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, 2016

2016 Mulhouse, France

Formes et couleurs dans la création textile focuses on shape and color in textiles from the eighteenth century to today.

Josef Albers
Teopanzolco, Cuernavaca, ca. 1936–39
photograph
9 5/8 x 7 11/16 in. (24.5 x 19.5 cm)
1976.7.453
Josef Albers
Sea Foam at Biarritz, ca. 1929
photograph
8 5/8 x 5 1/2 in. (22.1 x 14.1 cm)
1976.7.216

2017 Asheville, North Carolina

Begin To See: The Photographers of Black Mountain College is the first in-depth exhibition devoted to this topic. Photography began as a workshop at Black Mountain College in the 1930s. In the 1940s visiting photographers gave some instruction, and starting in 1944 photography courses were offered during the College's summer sessions. In fall 1949 photography began to be offered as part of the school's regular curriculum, with former student Hazel-Frieda Larsen being appointed the first full-time instructor in photography. Photographic education at Black Mountain College often focused on learning to see photographically, taking photographs, and the medium's history. Begin to See features photographs by a variety of artists including Josef Albers, Hazel Larsen Archer, Josef Breitenbach, Harry Callahan, Trude Guermonprez, Robert Haas, Clemens Kalischer, Barbara Morgan, Beaumont Newhall, Nancy Newhall, Andy Oates, Aaron Siskind, Stan VanDerBeek, and Jonathan Williams.

Anni Albers
Black White Yellow, 1926/1967
silk and rayon
80 × 47 in. (203 × 119 cm)
Victoria and Albert Museum 534-1968

2017 Margate, England

Entangled: Threads and Making is a major exhibition of sculpture, installation, tapestry, textiles, and jewelry from the early twentieth century to the present day. It features over forty international female artists who expand the possibilities of knitting and embroidery, weaving, sewing, and wood carving, often incorporating unexpected materials such as plants, clothing, hair, and bird quills. The exhibition brings together artists from different generations and cultures who challenge established categories of craft, design, and fine art, and who share a fascination with the handmade and the processes of making itself.

 
Anni Albers
Open Letter, 1958
cotton
23 × 24 in. (58.4 × 61 cm)
1994.12.4
Josef Albers
Study for a Variant, ca. 1947
oil and pencil on blotting paper
1976.2.270
Anonymous
Andean textile fragment (Chancay)
1994.16.21
Anonymous
Andean textile fragment (Huari or Early Chancay)
1994.16.74
Anonymous
Andean textile fragment (Late Horizon)
1994.16.97
Anni Albers
Red and Blue Layers, 1954
cotton
24 1/4 × 14 3/4 in. (61.6 × 37.8 cm)
1998.12.1
Josef Albers
Layered, 1940
oil on masonite
23 1/2 x 28 in. (59.7 x 71.1 cm)
1976.1.1032

2017 New Haven, Connecticut

Small-Great Objects: Anni and Josef Albers in the Americas examines intersections between the art-making and art-collecting strategies of the Alberses, two of the most influential figures of twentieth-century modernism. Between 1935 and 1967, the couple made numerous trips to Latin America and the American Southwest and amassed a large collection of ancient artworks from these regions. The exhibition looks at these objects in depth and considers how Anni and Josef's collection supported their aesthetic sensibilities and teaching practice. In addition to objects from the ancient Americas, the show gathers together dozens of works that the couple made, including textiles, paintings, works on paper, and rarely studied photographs that Josef took at archaeological sites and museums. Demonstrating the Alberses' deep and sustained engagement with ancient American art, an interest that was decades ahead of its time, Small-Great Objects explores a fascinating dimension of the couple's creative vision.

Josef Albers
Open (B), December 1940
oil on masonite
19 7/8 x 19 5/8 in. (50.5 x 49.8 cm)
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
Josef Albers
Concealing, December 1940
oil on masonite
27 7/8 x 23 1/4 in. (70.8 x 59.1 cm)
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
Josef Albers
Penetrating (B), 1943
oil, casein, and tempera on masonite
21 3/8 x 24 7/8 in. (54.3 x 63.2 cm)
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
Josef Albers
Bent Dark Gray, 1943
oil on masonite
19 x 14 in. (48.2 x 35.5 cm)
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

2017 New York

Visionaries: Creating a Modern Guggenheim explores nearly a century's worth of original artistic production, from the work of Camille Pissarro to Jackson Pollock, and illuminates the visionaries—artists and patrons alike—who helped to establish the Guggenheim's identity as a forward-looking institution. The Guggenheim Foundation's formative collection was shaped through major gifts and purchases from contemporaries who similarly championed radical experimentation in art. These acquisitions include a prized group of Impressionist, Post‑Impressionist, and School of Paris masterworks from Justin K. Thannhauser; the Expressionist inventory of émigré art dealer Karl Nierendorf; inimitable holdings of abstract and Surrealist painting and sculpture from self‑proclaimed "art addict" Peggy Guggenheim, Solomon's niece; and key modernist examples from the estate of artist and curator Katherine S. Dreier, as well as from the estate of artist Hilla Rebay, who was an important influence on Guggenheim.

Anni Albers
Second Movement II, 1978
etching and aquatint
28 × 28 in. (71.1 × 71.1 cm)
1994.11.49
Installation view, Anni Albers: L'Oeuvre Gravé, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Le Locle, 2017. Photo courtesy of Musée des Beaux-Arts
Installation view, Anni Albers: L'Oeuvre Gravé, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Le Locle, 2017. Photo courtesy of Musée des Beaux-Arts
Installation view, Anni Albers: L'Oeuvre Gravé, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Le Locle, 2017. Photo courtesy of Musée des Beaux-Arts
Installation view, Anni Albers: L'Oeuvre Gravé, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Le Locle, 2017. Photo courtesy of Musée des Beaux-Arts

2017 Le Locle, Switzerland

Anni Albers: L'Oeuvre Gravé presents a survey of prints by the artist. Albers turned her hand to printmaking in the 1960s and worked primarily in this medium until her death in 1994. Collaborating with some of the leading printers of the era she experimented with lithography, screen printing, embossing, woodcut, and various intaglio techniques. The exhibition is presented in collaboration with Alan Cristea Gallery, London.

Josef Albers
I-S LXXIIIb from Homage to the Square, 1973
screenprint
sheet: 28 x 28 in. (71.1 x 71.1 cm)
British Museum

2017 London

The American Dream: Pop to the Present considers works by celebrated American artists from the 1960s to today. The past six decades have been among the most dynamic and turbulent in US history, from JFK's assassination, Apollo 11 and Vietnam to the AIDS crisis, racism and gender politics. Responding to the changing times, American artists have produced prints unprecedented in their scale and ambition. Taking inspiration from the world around them—billboard advertising, global politics, Hollywood and household objects—American artists created highly original prints to rival their paintings and sculptures. Printmaking brought their work to a much wider and more diverse audience.

The sheer inventiveness and technical ingenuity of their prints reflects America's power and influence during this period. Many of these works also address the deep divisions in society that continue to resonate with us today. The American Dream presents the Museum's outstanding collection of modern and contemporary American prints for the first time. These will be shown with important works from museums and private collections around the world. The exhibition includes works by Josef Albers, Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Ed Ruscha, Kara Walker, and Julie Mehretu, among many others.

Josef Albers
Study for Homage to the Square: Still Remembered, 1954–56
oil on masonite
20 x 20 in. (51 x 51 cm)
Mart, Museum of Contemporary Art of Trento and Rovereto

2017 Turin

L'emozione dei COLORI nell'arte includes an extraordinary collection of over 400 works by 125 artists and other practitioners from around the world, dating from the late seventeenth century to today. The exhibition investigates the use of color in art through artistic movements and research that stands apart from canonical histories on color and abstraction, with multiple accounts relating to memory, politics, spirituality, storytelling, psychology, and synesthesia. By analyzing the different color theories that gradually took shape in the turbulent socio-political context that characterized the twentieth century, L'emozione dei COLORI nell'arte reflects on a perspective that considers light, its vibrations, and the world of emotions, while challenging the standardization of the use of color in the modern age (synthetic colors) and the digital era (RGB colors offered by various online palettes), a leveling that considerably reduces our ability to distinguish colors in the real world.

Anni Albers
Smyrna-Knüpfteppich, 1925/1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Anni Albers
Study for an Unexecuted Wallhanging, 1926/1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Anni Albers
With Verticals, 1946/1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Anni Albers
Untitled, 1948/1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Anni Albers
Study for Nylon Rug, 1959/1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Anni Albers
Study for Hooked Rug, 1964/1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Anni Albers
Triangulated Intaglio, 1974/1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Anni Albers
Orchestra III, 1980/1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Anni Albers
Untitled, 1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Josef Albers
Machine Art, cover design for exhibition catalogue for the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1934
Josef Albers
Study for Homage to the Square: Quietness, 1967
oil on masonite
32 x 32 in. (81.3 x 81.3 cm)
Kunsthalle Bielefeld

2017 Bielefeld, Germany

Partners in Design: Alfred H. Barr Jr. and Philip Johnson. Bauhaus Pioneers in America focuses on the collaboration and friendship between Alfred H. Barr Jr., the founding director of the Museum of Modern Art, New York (MoMA), and Philip Johnson, the first curator of architecture at the MoMA, and examines their shared role as the most influential proponents of the Bauhaus in America.

From the beginning, the MoMA had a department of architecture and design that was on an equal footing with the fine arts, much like the Bauhaus Dessau, which was Alfred Barr's role model in the conception and founding of the museum in 1929. Besides exhibitions of modern art, the MoMA presented two groundbreaking shows in its early years: Modern Architecture (1932) and Machine Art (1934). Philip Johnson organized these two exhibitions in close collaboration with Alfred Barr. Following their presentations at the MoMA, both shows traveled to many other venues in the United States, as did the next exhibition Useful Objects. The goal, which could almost be called a mission, was to help make the citizens of the United States conscious of good, modern design. The exhibition features works by Anni Albers, Josef Albers, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, and László Moholy-Nagy, among others.

Anni Albers
Black White Gray, 1927/1964
cotton and silk
58 1/4 × 47 3/4 in. (148 x 121.3 cm)
Anonymous
Andean textile fragment (Inca or Late Horizon)
1994.16.96

2017 Dessau, Germany

Craft Becomes Modern investigates the role of craft at the Bauhaus, emphasizing the role of making, material, and pedagogic processes, within the broader cultural and economic contexts of Germany during the Weimar Republic, 1919–1933. Presented in the original Bauhaus building in Dessau, the exhibition considers the Bauhaus workshops as sites of negotiation for the pressing issues of modern culture: individual authorship versus anonymous production; intellectual endeavor versus manual work; visual versus haptic knowledge; free experiment versus economic exploitation; popular spirit versus expert knowledge. Ultimately, the Bauhaus debates pointed toward new models for collective learning, work, and production at a time in which the devaluation of qualifications, resource shortages, economic crises, and mass unemployment influenced the political and social climate. The exhibition draws from international loans and the collection of the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation, featuring furniture, drawings, and objects of everyday use, as well as a broad range of student work never before shown in public. Examples from the weaving workshop include pre-Columbian textiles collected by Anni Albers. The exhibition is an integral part of the Bauhaus Centenary 2019, a collaborative project of the three Bauhaus sites in Weimar, Dessau, and Berlin.

Anni Albers
Tapestry, 1948
handwoven linen and cotton
16 1/2 x 18 3/4 in. (41.9 x 47.6 cm)
Museum of Modern Art, New York

2017 New York

Making Space shines a spotlight on the stunning achievements of women artists between the end of World War II (1945) and the start of the Feminist movement (around 1968). In the postwar era, societal shifts made it possible for larger numbers of women to work professionally as artists, yet their work was often dismissed in the male dominated art world, and few support networks existed for them. Abstraction dominated artistic practice during these years, as many artists working in the aftermath of World War II sought an international language that might transcend national and regional narratives—and for women artists, additionally, those relating to gender.

Drawn entirely from the MoMA's collection, the exhibition features more than 100 paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, prints, textiles, and ceramics by some 50 artists. Within a trajectory that is at once loosely chronological and synchronous, it includes works that range from the boldly gestural canvases of Lee Krasner, Helen Frankenthaler, and Joan Mitchell; the radical geometries by Lygia Clark, Lygia Pape, and Gego; and the reductive abstractions of Agnes Martin, Anne Truitt, and Jo Baer; to the fiber weavings of Magdalena Abakanowicz, Anni Albers, Sheila Hicks, and Lenore Tawney; and the process-oriented sculptures of Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, and Eva Hesse.