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Josef Albers
Day + Night III, 1963
from the portfolio Day and Night: Homage to the Square
lithograph
sheet: 18 3/4 x 20 1/2 in. (47.6 x 52 cm)
Museum of Modern Art, New York

2016 New York

From the Collection: 1960–1969 includes works from all of the MoMA's curatorial departments as well as its library and archives. The exhibition focuses on a decade in which interdisciplinary artistic experimentation flourished, traditional mediums were transformed, and sociopolitical upheaval occurred across the globe.

Anni Albers
Rug design for a child’s room, 1928
gouache on paper
13 7/16 × 10 7/16 in. (34.1 × 26.5 cm)
Museum of Modern Art, New York 405.1951

2016 New York

How Should We Live? explores the complex collaborations, materials, and processes that have shaped the modernist interior, with a focus on specific environments—domestic interiors, re-created exhibition displays, and retail spaces—from the 1920s to the 1950s. The exhibition brings together over 200 works, drawn from MoMA's Architecture and Design collection as well as the Library, Drawings and Prints, Painting and Sculpture, Film, and Photography. Rather than concentrating on isolated masterworks, attention is given to the synthesis of design elements within each environment, and to the connection of external factors and attitudes—aesthetic, social, technological, and political—that these environments reflect.

The exhibition looks at several designers' own living spaces, and at frequently neglected areas in the field of design, including textile furnishings, wallpapers, kitchens, temporary exhibitions, and promotional displays. Highlights include recent acquisitions from projects directed by major women architect-designers—Eileen Gray furnishings for the house E-1027 (1929), and Charlotte Perriand's study bedroom from the Maison du Brésil (1959), for example. Designs from other noted partnerships include Lilly Reich and Mies van der Rohe's Velvet and Silk Café (1927), Grete Lihotzky's Frankfurt Kitchen (1926–27), and collaborations between Aino and Alvar Aalto, Ray and Charles Eames, Florence Knoll and Herbert Matter, and Charlotte Perriand, Pierre Jeanneret and Le Corbusier, as well as individual works by Anni Albers and Clara Porcet, among many others.

Josef Albers
I-S Va 6, 1969
from the portfolio Six Variants
screenprint
sheet: 28 x 36 in. (71.1 x 91.4 cm)

2016 Zurich

Max Peiffer Watenphul and His Companions presents paintings by the artist alongside works by contemporaries including Josef Albers, Umberto Boccioni, Marc Chagall, Natalia Goncharova, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, and Xanti Schawinsky, among many others.

Anni Albers
Study for unexecuted wallhanging, 1926
gouache with pencil on photo offset paper
15 x 9 3/4 in. (38.1 x 24.7 cm)
1994.10.1
Anni Albers
Wallhanging, 1924
cotton and silk
66 1/4 × 39 1/2 in. (168.3 × 100.3 cm)
1994.12.1
Josef Albers
Aufwärts (Upward), ca. 1926
sandblasted flashed glass with black paint
1976.6.2
Josef Albers
Design for a universal typeface, ca. 1926
ink and pencil on paper
8 5/16 x 11 3/4 in. (21.1 x 29.8 cm)
1976.3.124

2016 Paris

L'Esprit du Bauhaus traces the periods and forms of art that forged the Bauhaus spirit: the Middle Ages and the construction of cathedrals, the arts of the Asian and Islamic worlds, and the British Arts and Crafts movement that abolished the frontiers between art and craftsmanship. From 1919 to 1933, in Weimar, Dessau, and Berlin, the Bauhaus established a new kind of school where painters, architects, artisans, engineers, actors, musicians, photographers, and designers worked together to forge a new concept of daily living through a synthesis of the visual arts, craftsmanship, and industry. The Musée des Arts Décoratifs is paying tribute to this spirit of invention, freedom, creation, and the passing on of knowledge and skills that the great artists, architects, and designers who taught and studied at the Bauhaus went on to propagate throughout the twentieth century. Featured works include historic Bauhaus pieces, together with contemporary counterparts including works by Székély, Matthieu Mercier, Karen Bisch, Sheila Hicks, and Ulla von Brandenburg.

Hermès Editeur 1: Hommage au Carré by Josef Albers
© Hermès © The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, 2016

2016 Mulhouse, France

Formes et couleurs dans la création textile focuses on shape and color in textiles from the eighteenth century to today.

Josef Albers
Oskar Schlemmer; [Schlemmer] in the Master’s Council; [Schlemmer] with Wittwer, Kallai, and Marianne Brandt, Preliminary Course Exhibition; [Schlemmer] and Tut, 1928–30/32
gelatin silver prints mounted to board
overall: 11 5/8 × 16 3/8 in. (29.5 × 41.6 cm)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York

2016 New York

One and One Is Four: The Bauhaus Photocollages of Josef Albers focuses exclusively on this deeply personal and inventive aspect of Albers's work. One of the least familiar aspects of Albers's career is his inventive engagement with photography, which was only discovered after his death. The highlight of this work is undoubtedly the photocollages featuring photographs he made at the Bauhaus between 1928 and 1932. At once expansive and restrained, this body of work anticipates concerns that Albers would pursue throughout his career: seriality, perception, and the relationship between handcraft and mechanical production. MoMA presented the first serious exploration of Albers's photographic practice in 1988, The Photographs of Josef Albers. In 2015, the Museum acquired ten photocollages by Albers—adding to the two donated by the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation almost three decades ago—making its collection the most significant anywhere outside the Foundation. This installation celebrates both the landmark acquisition and its related publication.

Josef Albers
Study for Homage to the Square: Aurora, 1957
oil on masonite
24 x 24 in. (61 x 61 cm)
1976.1.1828
Josef Albers
Study for Homage to the Square, n.d.
oil and graphite on blotting paper
12 x 12 in. (30.5 x 30.5 cm)
1976.2.79
Josef Albers
Study for a Variant, ca. 1947
oil and graphite on blotting paper
9 1/2 x 12 in. (24.1 x 30.5 cm)
1976.2.273
Josef Albers
Study for Homage to the Square: 2 Grays between 2 Yellows, 1961
oil on masonite
22 x 22 in. (55.9 x 55.9 cm)
1976.1.63
Josef Albers
Study for Homage to the Square: Now, 1962
oil on masonite
24 x 24 in. (61 x 61 cm)
1976.1.65
Installation view, Josef Albers: Sunny Side Up, David Zwirner Gallery, London, 2017. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery
Installation view, Josef Albers: Sunny Side Up, David Zwirner Gallery, London, 2017. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery
Installation view, Josef Albers: Sunny Side Up, David Zwirner Gallery, London, 2017. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery
Installation view, Josef Albers: Sunny Side Up, David Zwirner Gallery, London, 2017. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery
Installation view, Josef Albers: Sunny Side Up, David Zwirner Gallery, London, 2017. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery

2017 London

Josef Albers: Sunny Side Up presents a trove of paintings over five decades in which yellow dominates, conveying the limitless expressive potential of color and light that characterizes Albers's practice as a whole. If there was any single inspirer of Josef Albers's embrace of color it was the German Romantic poet, Johann Wolfgang Goethe. As a young artist, Albers owned an early edition of Goethe's Theory of Color (1810) in which the poet wrote ". . . a strong yellow on lustrous silk . . . has a magnificent and noble effect. We also experience a very warm and cozy impression with yellow. Thus, in painting, too, it belongs among the luminous and active colors. . . . The eye is gladdened, the heart expands, the feelings are cheered, an immediate warmth seems to waft toward us."

Sunny Side Up brings a touch of that warmth, presenting a selection of the artist's iconic Homage to the Square paintings, begun in 1950 and elaborated on until his death in 1976. Exploring a variety of chromatic and perceptual effects, the Homage to the Square paintings serve as a sustained, serial investigation into rhythm, mood, and spatial movement within a carefully configured nested square format. Also on view are paintings from Albers's earlier Variant/Adobe series, as well as color studies and additional works on paper. The exhibition forms a pendant to David Zwirner's previous Albers exhibition in New York (November–December 2016), Josef Albers: Grey Scales, Grey Steps, Grey Ladders, which focused on the artist's use of black, white, and grey.

Josef Albers
Teopanzolco, Cuernavaca, ca. 1936–39
photograph
9 5/8 x 7 11/16 in. (24.5 x 19.5 cm)
1976.7.453
Josef Albers
Sea Foam at Biarritz, ca. 1929
photograph
8 5/8 x 5 1/2 in. (22.1 x 14.1 cm)
1976.7.216

2017 Asheville, North Carolina

Begin To See: The Photographers of Black Mountain College is the first in-depth exhibition devoted to this topic. Photography began as a workshop at Black Mountain College in the 1930s. In the 1940s visiting photographers gave some instruction, and starting in 1944 photography courses were offered during the College's summer sessions. In fall 1949 photography began to be offered as part of the school's regular curriculum, with former student Hazel-Frieda Larsen being appointed the first full-time instructor in photography. Photographic education at Black Mountain College often focused on learning to see photographically, taking photographs, and the medium's history. Begin to See features photographs by a variety of artists including Josef Albers, Hazel Larsen Archer, Josef Breitenbach, Harry Callahan, Trude Guermonprez, Robert Haas, Clemens Kalischer, Barbara Morgan, Beaumont Newhall, Nancy Newhall, Andy Oates, Aaron Siskind, Stan VanDerBeek, and Jonathan Williams.

Anni Albers
Black White Gray, 1927/1964
cotton and silk
58 1/4 × 47 3/4 in. (148 x 121.3 cm)

2017 Berlin

In the Carpet investigates exchanges between centers in Europe and in Morocco with the mutual influences between the practices of art and craft. The exhibition addresses stories with multiple time frames, from the Bauhaus to now, and unveils the resonances between traditional Berber carpets and contemporary art. The narration starts with the emblematic figure of Sheila Hicks who traveled to Morocco in the early 1970s to encounter traditional weaving practices. Historical pieces are exhibited as a testimony of the formal dialogue between Berber carpets (Zemmour and Béni Ourarain) and the Bauhaus figures of Anni Albers and Gunta Stölzl. Also featured is the Group of "L'Ecole de Casablanca," including the artwork of founding member Mohammed Melehi. Created in 1964, the Group of L'Ecole de Casablanca defines an aesthetic language liberated from a euro-centered art history by drawing its inspiration from the plural histories and cultures of Morocco. The exhibition engages with the polysemous definitions of carpets—object and representation, physical and mental space, territory, form and technique, gesture and performance, such as: Souvenir: la lecon de géométrie, 2015, created by Saâdane Afif. These works highlight the complex phenomena of superposition or fusion, the exchanges between cultures and countries and underline the overlaps between contemporary art and traditional practices.

Anni Albers
Black White Yellow, 1926/1967
silk and rayon
80 × 47 in. (203 × 119 cm)
Victoria and Albert Museum 534-1968

2017 Margate, England

Entangled: Threads and Making is a major exhibition of sculpture, installation, tapestry, textiles, and jewelry from the early twentieth century to the present day. It features over forty international female artists who expand the possibilities of knitting and embroidery, weaving, sewing, and wood carving, often incorporating unexpected materials such as plants, clothing, hair, and bird quills. The exhibition brings together artists from different generations and cultures who challenge established categories of craft, design, and fine art, and who share a fascination with the handmade and the processes of making itself.

 
Anni Albers
Open Letter, 1958
cotton
23 × 24 in. (58.4 × 61 cm)
1994.12.4
Josef Albers
Study for a Variant, ca. 1947
oil and pencil on blotting paper
1976.2.270
Anonymous
Andean textile fragment (Chancay)
1994.16.21
Anonymous
Andean textile fragment (Huari or Early Chancay)
1994.16.74
Anonymous
Andean textile fragment (Late Horizon)
1994.16.97
Anni Albers
Red and Blue Layers, 1954
cotton
24 1/4 × 14 3/4 in. (61.6 × 37.8 cm)
1998.12.1
Josef Albers
Layered, 1940
oil on masonite
23 1/2 x 28 in. (59.7 x 71.1 cm)
1976.1.1032

2017 New Haven, Connecticut

Small-Great Objects: Anni and Josef Albers in the Americas examines intersections between the art-making and art-collecting strategies of the Alberses, two of the most influential figures of twentieth-century modernism. Between 1935 and 1967, the couple made numerous trips to Latin America and the American Southwest and amassed a large collection of ancient artworks from these regions. The exhibition looks at these objects in depth and considers how Anni and Josef's collection supported their aesthetic sensibilities and teaching practice. In addition to objects from the ancient Americas, the show gathers together dozens of works that the couple made, including textiles, paintings, works on paper, and rarely studied photographs that Josef took at archaeological sites and museums. Demonstrating the Alberses' deep and sustained engagement with ancient American art, an interest that was decades ahead of its time, Small-Great Objects explores a fascinating dimension of the couple's creative vision.

Anni Albers
Second Movement II, 1978
etching and aquatint
28 × 28 in. (71.1 × 71.1 cm)
1994.11.49

2017 Le Locle, Switzerland

Anni Albers: L'Oeuvre Gravé presents a survey of prints by the artist. Albers turned her hand to printmaking in the 1960s and worked primarily in this medium until her death in 1994. Collaborating with some of the leading printers of the era she experimented with lithography, screen printing, embossing, woodcut, and various intaglio techniques. The exhibition is presented in collaboration with Alan Cristea Gallery, London.