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Hermès Editeur 1: Hommage au Carré by Josef Albers
© Hermès © The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, 2016

2016 Mulhouse, France

Formes et couleurs dans la création textile focuses on shape and color in textiles from the eighteenth century to today.

Josef Albers
Marching X’s, 1940
oil on masonite
23 7/8 x 24 in. (60.6 x 60.9 cm)
Situation Kunst (für Max Imdahl)

2016 Bochum, Germany

Artige Kunst. Kunst und Politik im Nationalsozialismus (Compliant Art: Art and Politics in National Socialism) considers the art policy of national socialism, which was essential for the self-image of the regime. The exhibition presents exemplary works of the officially tolerated and sponsored art of the Nazi era alongside works by persecuted artists, who boldly provided a counterpart to the simple nature of system-conforming art.

Anni Albers
Black White Gray, 1927/1964
cotton and silk
58 1/4 × 47 3/4 in. (148 x 121.3 cm)
Anonymous
Andean textile fragment (Inca or Late Horizon)
1994.16.96

2017 Dessau, Germany

Craft Becomes Modern investigates the role of craft at the Bauhaus, emphasizing the role of making, material, and pedagogic processes, within the broader cultural and economic contexts of Germany during the Weimar Republic, 1919–1933. Presented in the original Bauhaus building in Dessau, the exhibition considers the Bauhaus workshops as sites of negotiation for the pressing issues of modern culture: individual authorship versus anonymous production; intellectual endeavor versus manual work; visual versus haptic knowledge; free experiment versus economic exploitation; popular spirit versus expert knowledge. Ultimately, the Bauhaus debates pointed toward new models for collective learning, work, and production at a time in which the devaluation of qualifications, resource shortages, economic crises, and mass unemployment influenced the political and social climate. The exhibition draws from international loans and the collection of the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation, featuring furniture, drawings, and objects of everyday use, as well as a broad range of student work never before shown in public. Examples from the weaving workshop include pre-Columbian textiles collected by Anni Albers. The exhibition is an integral part of the Bauhaus Centenary 2019, a collaborative project of the three Bauhaus sites in Weimar, Dessau, and Berlin.

Anni Albers
Necklace, ca. 1940
drain strainer and paper clips
length: 16 in. (40.6 cm), strainer: 3 in. (7.6 cm) diameter
1994.14.16

2017 Paris

Medusa considers our relationship to jewelry both physically and conceptually. Neither sculpture nor fashion per se, jewelry lies somewhere in between. Jewelry is an art form, but it is rarely considered a work of art. Jewelry is a kind of taboo in the art world, contradictory to what an artwork is supposed to be. It is seen as too gendered (too feminine), too precious, too corporeal and decorative, and too primitive and useless. Jewelry creates an attraction/repulsion for the one who stares at it, wears it or makes it, as the mythological face of Medusa.

The exhibition gathers 400 works—handmade, delegated, unique or multiple—by artists, studio jewelry designers, and contemporary and high end makers, as well as historical pieces. Medusa envisions jewelry as a meta language, a transitional object that adorns and socializes the body, and allows it to re-invent itself, in the private or public spheres: a crucial tool in terms of body politics. The show aims to go beyond the no-go "legitimacy" discourse, in favor of a critical perspective that respects jewelry's status as a peripheral, problematic and fascinating object.

Josef Albers
Full, 1962
from the portfolio Homage to the Square: Ten Works by Josef Albers
screenprint
sheet: 16 1/2 x 16 1/2 in. (41.9 x 41.9 cm)

2017 Birmingham, Alabama

Homage to the Square: Ten Works by Josef Albers features a set of ten screen prints by the artist from 1962. Each print is poetically titled, encouraging visitors to make connections between the meaning behind the titles and the experience viewing the prints. Albers is best known for the hundreds of paintings and prints from his series Homage to the Square, which explores the interaction of colors within a composition of three or four nested squares.

Josef Albers
Untitled Abstraction V, ca. 1945
graphite and gouache on paper
9 7/8 x 6 1/3 in. (16.2 x 25.1 cm)
Tate Gallery of Modern Art, London

2017 Warwickshire, United Kingdom

Seurat to Riley: The Art of Perception looks at the ways in which our visual perceptions have been explored by artists. From the Impressionists onwards, artists have been inspired by the color theories of scientific thinkers such as Michel Eugène Chevreul. The most famous examples are the pointillist works of Georges Seurat and his associates, in which colors other than those actually painted on the canvas are generated in the eye of the beholder through the application of small dots of primary color.

During the twentieth century, and culminating in the famous Op art movement of the 1960s onwards, the scientific and philosophical interest in perception extended into ways of communicating movement via static art forms. Early explorations of this can be seen in work by artists such as Helen Saunders, M.C. Escher, and Josef Albers using tessellation, pattern, line, mathematics, and color, and sometimes optical trickery, to convey the sensation of movement.

This wide-ranging show features work by artists from the 1960s—such as Jim Lambie, Christiane Baumgartner, Daniel Buren, Liz West and Lothar Götz—alongside later works of those who became stars of the Op art movement and who continued to develop and explore new possibilities, including Bridget Riley, Victor Vasarely, Jesus Rafael Soto, Julio Le Parc, Peter Sedgley, Jeffrey Steele, and Carlos Cruz-Diez.

 
Josef Albers
Formulation: Articulation, Folio I / Folder 19, "Homage to the Square" (left-hand image), 1972
screenprint
sheet: 15 x 40 in. (38.1 x 101.6 cm)
Josef Albers
Formulation: Articulation, Folio I / Folder 19, "Homage to the Square" (right-hand image), 1972
screenprint
sheet: 15 x 40 in. (38.1 x 101.6 cm)

2017 Gainesville, Florida

Poetic and Political explores two realms of perception often considered oppositional but more likely to work in tandem to make a rich, provocative and compelling visual impact. The exhibition juxtaposes the work of Josef Albers, a single artist focused exclusively on the psychic and emotive qualities of color, with African and African American artists who confront the historic and contemporary traces of colonialism as they contribute to the power of healing and renewal. Both aesthetic and political trajectories intertwine, demanding sensitivity, keen perception, and a heightened awareness of context, change and transformation.

Josef Albers's famous series, Homage to the Square and several prints from the portfolio, Formulation: Articulation, Volume I, are remarkably poetic. Albers believed that color creates a psychic and emotional effect. Even so, his work was based on a mathematically determined format. Albers experimented with the relativity of color, how it changes through juxtaposition, placement and interaction with other colors. Throughout his work, Albers found a link between formal elements in art and social behavior.

African and African American artists in the exhibition combine the poetic with a focus on history and politics. The story of the Diaspora persists in these works. Art historian T. J. Demos argues that the colonial past still haunts Africa because the past has not really passed. Artists in this installation contest historic amnesia and confront the material traces and psychic scars of colonialism while acknowledging and contributing to the power of healing and reconciliation in Africa and in the Diaspora. Many artists focus on the present, concerned with national and personal identity amidst economic disparity and changing social tradition. Works by El Anatsui, William Kentridge, Zanele Muholi, Zohra Opoku and Yelimane Fall are just a few of the works made from the finest aesthetic and poetic practice.

Josef Albers
Gate, 1936
oil on masonite
19 1/2 x 20 3/16 in. (49.5 x 51.3 cm)
Yale University Art Gallery

2017 New Haven, Connecticut

Artists in Exile: Expressions of Loss and Hope presents an innovative approach to the theme of exile, considering artists who left their country of birth, or their adopted home, for a variety of reasons—including discrimination, war, and genocide—from the nineteenth century to the present day. The exhibition explores exile as not only a mental or physical state but also a catalyst for creativity; indeed, for many artists, separation from the familiar, either willing or unwilling, inspired innovations in form and technique. The installation features works by such well-known European artists as Jacques-Louis David, Gustave Courbet, Paul Gauguin, Josef Albers, Kurt Schwitters, Marcel Duchamp, and George Grosz, while also advocating a more global perspective through works by Arshile Gorky, Matta, Elizabeth Catlett, Ana Mendieta, Mu Xin, Shirin Neshat, An-My Lê, Mona Hatoum, Abelardo Morell, and Ahmed Alsoudani, and paying notable attention to female artists. The majority of the objects on display are drawn from the Yale University Art Gallery's encyclopedic collection, enriched by the addition of key loans from other institutions and private collections.

Josef Albers
Homage to the Square: Post Autumn, 1963
oil on masonite
40 x 40 in. (101.6 x 101.6 cm)
Private collection

2017 Sheffield, United Kingdom

Going Public: The Kirkland Collection is part of the exhibition series Going Public: International Art Collectors in Sheffield. Reflecting a passion for photography, minimalism, and geometric abstraction, Jack Kirkland's personal collection brings together work by some of the most important artists of the past seventy-five years. The exhibition showcases personally selected highlights from the collection, including painting, sculpture, works on paper, and photography by artists such as Carl Andre, Donald Judd, Josef and Anni Albers, Bridget Riley, and Lewis Baltz, among others.

2017 Sydney, Australia

Josef Albers
Angular, 1935
oil on composition board
16 × 19 3/4 in. (40.6 x 50.2 cm)
2003.1.1
Josef Albers
Familiar Front, 1948–52
oil on masonite
13 3/4 x 21 in. (33 x 53.3 cm)
1976.1.1383
Josef Albers
Oscillating (C), 1940-45
oil on masonite
27 x 24 in. (68.6 x 61 cm)
1976.1.1367

2017 Savannah, Georgia

Jacob Lawrence: Lines of Influence is a group exhibition commemorating the centennial celebration of the birth of acclaimed painter, storyteller, educator, and chronicler of the mid–twentieth–century African American experience, Jacob Lawrence. The exhibition features a diverse selection of historical and contemporary artists in a multifaceted experience spanning three galleries within the museum. The curatorial approach emphasizes a contextually rich and widespread ground for the reading of Lawrence's work. During his lifetime, Lawrence occupied an interstitial position in the art world. He was considered both an insider and outsider, caught in a racially divided environment and edged to the margins of American modernism despite significant early exhibitions at renowned institutions such as the Museum of Modern Art and features in national press outlets. This exhibition makes strides to unravel such categorizations.

Featured artists include Josef Albers, Richmond Barthé, Romare Bearden, Sanford Biggers, José Clemente Orozco, Stuart Davis, George Grosz, Marsden Hartley, Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence, Horace Pippin, Faith Ringgold, Diego Rivera, Augusta Savage, and Kara Walker among others.

Josef Albers
Hommage au Carré, 1965
one from the portfolio of twelve
screenprint
sheet: 19 x 30 in. (48.3 x 76.2 cm)

2017 Düsseldorf

Cutting Edge: Albers, Gaul, Knoebel features the work of Josef Albers, Winfred Gaul, and Imi Knoebel.