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Hermès Editeur 1: Hommage au Carré by Josef Albers
© Hermès © The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, 2016

2016 Mulhouse, France

Formes et couleurs dans la création textile focuses on shape and color in textiles from the eighteenth century to today.

Josef Albers
Open (B), December 1940
oil on masonite
19 7/8 x 19 5/8 in. (50.5 x 49.8 cm)
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
Josef Albers
Concealing, December 1940
oil on masonite
27 7/8 x 23 1/4 in. (70.8 x 59.1 cm)
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
Josef Albers
Penetrating (B), 1943
oil, casein, and tempera on masonite
21 3/8 x 24 7/8 in. (54.3 x 63.2 cm)
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
Josef Albers
Bent Dark Gray, 1943
oil on masonite
19 x 14 in. (48.2 x 35.5 cm)
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

2017 New York

Visionaries: Creating a Modern Guggenheim explores nearly a century's worth of original artistic production, from the work of Camille Pissarro to Jackson Pollock, and illuminates the visionaries—artists and patrons alike—who helped to establish the Guggenheim's identity as a forward-looking institution. The Guggenheim Foundation's formative collection was shaped through major gifts and purchases from contemporaries who similarly championed radical experimentation in art. These acquisitions include a prized group of Impressionist, Post‑Impressionist, and School of Paris masterworks from Justin K. Thannhauser; the Expressionist inventory of émigré art dealer Karl Nierendorf; inimitable holdings of abstract and Surrealist painting and sculpture from self‑proclaimed "art addict" Peggy Guggenheim, Solomon's niece; and key modernist examples from the estate of artist and curator Katherine S. Dreier, as well as from the estate of artist Hilla Rebay, who was an important influence on Guggenheim.

Josef Albers
Formulation: Articulation, Folio I / Folder 28 (left-hand image), 1972
screenprint
sheet: 15 x 40 in. (38.1 x 101.6 cm)
Josef Albers
Formulation: Articulation, Folio I / Folder 28 (right-hand image), 1972
screenprint
sheet: 15 x 40 in. (38.1 x 101.6 cm)

2017 Champaign, Illinois

Dynamic Structures: American Abstract Artists features artists who were members of the American Abstract Artists (AAA). In 1936, several artists in New York City, who grew tired of the lack of exhibiting opportunities for abstract artists, convened to discuss ways to promote and further the works of abstraction. The AAA emerged as a diverse group who engaged in various applications of abstraction: dynamic, clear geometry; abstraction influenced by surrealism and expressionism, often with biomorphic elements; and abstraction informed by the natural landscape. Overlooked during the 1930s and 1940s by major institutions, such as the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art, the AAA aggressively protested these institutions and instead held their own exhibitions and forums to help garner acceptance of abstract art. The AAA can be seen as a predecessor to the New York School and abstract expressionism. The exhibition features works by Josef Albers, Mel Bochner, Louise Bourgeois, Alexander Corazzo, Sidney Gordin, Balcomb Greene, Gertrude Greene, Carl Holty, Karl Knaths, Sol LeWitt, George L. K. Morris, Louise Nevelson, Irene Rice Peirera, Judith Rothschild, Louis Schanker, Charles Green Shaw, Esphyr Slobodkina, David Smith, and Jean Xceron.

Josef Albers
Study for Homage to the Square: Still Remembered, 1954–56
oil on masonite
20 x 20 in. (51 x 51 cm)
Mart, Museum of Contemporary Art of Trento and Rovereto

2017 Turin

L'emozione dei COLORI nell'arte includes an extraordinary collection of over 400 works by 125 artists and other practitioners from around the world, dating from the late seventeenth century to today. The exhibition investigates the use of color in art through artistic movements and research that stands apart from canonical histories on color and abstraction, with multiple accounts relating to memory, politics, spirituality, storytelling, psychology, and synesthesia. By analyzing the different color theories that gradually took shape in the turbulent socio-political context that characterized the twentieth century, L'emozione dei COLORI nell'arte reflects on a perspective that considers light, its vibrations, and the world of emotions, while challenging the standardization of the use of color in the modern age (synthetic colors) and the digital era (RGB colors offered by various online palettes), a leveling that considerably reduces our ability to distinguish colors in the real world.

Anni Albers
Smyrna-Knüpfteppich, 1925/1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Anni Albers
Study for an Unexecuted Wallhanging, 1926/1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Anni Albers
With Verticals, 1946/1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Anni Albers
Untitled, 1948/1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Anni Albers
Study for Nylon Rug, 1959/1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Anni Albers
Study for Hooked Rug, 1964/1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Anni Albers
Triangulated Intaglio, 1974/1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Anni Albers
Orchestra III, 1980/1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Anni Albers
Untitled, 1983
from the portfolio Connections
screenprint
sheet: 27 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. (69.5 x 49.5 cm)
Josef Albers
Machine Art, cover design for exhibition catalogue for the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1934
Josef Albers
Study for Homage to the Square: Quietness, 1967
oil on masonite
32 x 32 in. (81.3 x 81.3 cm)
Kunsthalle Bielefeld

2017 Bielefeld, Germany

Partners in Design: Alfred H. Barr Jr. and Philip Johnson. Bauhaus Pioneers in America focuses on the collaboration and friendship between Alfred H. Barr Jr., the founding director of the Museum of Modern Art, New York (MoMA), and Philip Johnson, the first curator of architecture at the MoMA, and examines their shared role as the most influential proponents of the Bauhaus in America.

From the beginning, the MoMA had a department of architecture and design that was on an equal footing with the fine arts, much like the Bauhaus Dessau, which was Alfred Barr's role model in the conception and founding of the museum in 1929. Besides exhibitions of modern art, the MoMA presented two groundbreaking shows in its early years: Modern Architecture (1932) and Machine Art (1934). Philip Johnson organized these two exhibitions in close collaboration with Alfred Barr. Following their presentations at the MoMA, both shows traveled to many other venues in the United States, as did the next exhibition Useful Objects. The goal, which could almost be called a mission, was to help make the citizens of the United States conscious of good, modern design. The exhibition features works by Anni Albers, Josef Albers, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, and László Moholy-Nagy, among others.

Anni Albers
Black White Gray, 1927/1964
cotton and silk
58 1/4 × 47 3/4 in. (148 x 121.3 cm)
Anonymous
Andean textile fragment (Inca or Late Horizon)
1994.16.96

2017 Dessau, Germany

Craft Becomes Modern investigates the role of craft at the Bauhaus, emphasizing the role of making, material, and pedagogic processes, within the broader cultural and economic contexts of Germany during the Weimar Republic, 1919–1933. Presented in the original Bauhaus building in Dessau, the exhibition considers the Bauhaus workshops as sites of negotiation for the pressing issues of modern culture: individual authorship versus anonymous production; intellectual endeavor versus manual work; visual versus haptic knowledge; free experiment versus economic exploitation; popular spirit versus expert knowledge. Ultimately, the Bauhaus debates pointed toward new models for collective learning, work, and production at a time in which the devaluation of qualifications, resource shortages, economic crises, and mass unemployment influenced the political and social climate. The exhibition draws from international loans and the collection of the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation, featuring furniture, drawings, and objects of everyday use, as well as a broad range of student work never before shown in public. Examples from the weaving workshop include pre-Columbian textiles collected by Anni Albers. The exhibition is an integral part of the Bauhaus Centenary 2019, a collaborative project of the three Bauhaus sites in Weimar, Dessau, and Berlin.

Anni Albers
Tapestry, 1948
handwoven linen and cotton
16 1/2 x 18 3/4 in. (41.9 x 47.6 cm)
Museum of Modern Art, New York

2017 New York

Making Space shines a spotlight on the stunning achievements of women artists between the end of World War II (1945) and the start of the Feminist movement (around 1968). In the postwar era, societal shifts made it possible for larger numbers of women to work professionally as artists, yet their work was often dismissed in the male dominated art world, and few support networks existed for them. Abstraction dominated artistic practice during these years, as many artists working in the aftermath of World War II sought an international language that might transcend national and regional narratives—and for women artists, additionally, those relating to gender.

Drawn entirely from the MoMA's collection, the exhibition features more than 100 paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, prints, textiles, and ceramics by some 50 artists. Within a trajectory that is at once loosely chronological and synchronous, it includes works that range from the boldly gestural canvases of Lee Krasner, Helen Frankenthaler, and Joan Mitchell; the radical geometries by Lygia Clark, Lygia Pape, and Gego; and the reductive abstractions of Agnes Martin, Anne Truitt, and Jo Baer; to the fiber weavings of Magdalena Abakanowicz, Anni Albers, Sheila Hicks, and Lenore Tawney; and the process-oriented sculptures of Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, and Eva Hesse.

2017 Bochum, Germany

Anni Albers
GR I, 1970
screenprint
sheet: 29 x 24 in. (73.6 x 60.9 cm)
1994.11.18

2017 Rochester, New York

Minimal Mostly features work by Anni and Josef Albers, Carmen Herrera, Ellsworth Kelly, Sol LeWitt, Agnes Martin, and Frank Stella, among others. The exhibition includes objects in a variety of media—painting, print, sculpture and photo-based work—and examines the stylistic varieties within Minimalism as well as its continued influence on visual art today by younger artists committed to the practice.

Anni Albers
Necklace, ca. 1940
drain strainer and paper clips
length: 16 in. (40.6 cm), strainer: 3 in. (7.6 cm) diameter
1994.14.16

2017 Paris

Medusa considers our relationship to jewelry both physically and conceptually. Neither sculpture nor fashion per se, jewelry lies somewhere in between. Jewelry is an art form, but it is rarely considered a work of art. Jewelry is a kind of taboo in the art world, contradictory to what an artwork is supposed to be. It is seen as too gendered (too feminine), too precious, too corporeal and decorative, and too primitive and useless. Jewelry creates an attraction/repulsion for the one who stares at it, wears it or makes it, as the mythological face of Medusa.

The exhibition gathers 400 works—handmade, delegated, unique or multiple—by artists, studio jewelry designers, and contemporary and high end makers, as well as historical pieces. Medusa envisions jewelry as a meta language, a transitional object that adorns and socializes the body, and allows it to re-invent itself, in the private or public spheres: a crucial tool in terms of body politics. The show aims to go beyond the no-go "legitimacy" discourse, in favor of a critical perspective that respects jewelry's status as a peripheral, problematic and fascinating object.

Josef Albers
Gray Instrumentation Ia, 1974
one from the portfolio of twelve
screenprint
sheet: 19 x 19 in. (48.2 x 48.2 cm)

2017 Madison, Wisconsin

Sets: Printed Variations presents a selection of sets of prints from the Chazen's permanent collection. Although these sets are made up of individual works which can stand independently, this exhibition shows them as groups of works, as they were originally created. Series of prints have long been used to tell stories. However, in the twentieth century, the print set became more open-ended. Artists often created print series to explore variations on a theme, as in Josef Albers's series of ten prints Gray Instrumentation (1974). All the prints have the same composition—four superimposed squares all printed in shades of gray. The exact shades of gray vary from print to print. The set as a whole is a meditation on color and its interaction. Although each of the prints is a work of art in its own right, when seen together they create an experience of color gray which makes us aware of how these subtle tones affect each other.

On the other hand, Mother's Kisses (1982) the print set by Dottie Attie acts to humorously deconstruct a portion of Bronzino's famous Allegory of Venus and Cupid. Attie extracted and recreated the sensual figures of Venus and Cupid from the painting and then divided them up into small squares; she interspersed these with platitudes that are slyly undermined by Bronzino's image.

Willie Cole's more personal triptych Man Spirit Mask (1999) presents evocative images that probe our perceptions of self and race. The set of three prints is part of a body of Cole's work that derives imagery from household clothing irons to evoke domestic work as well as ritual scarification. The prints also incorporate self-portraits of the artist. That combination of the mundane, the ritual, and the personal creates layers of cultural connotations on top of the graphic images.

The exhibition presents these and other sets in their entirety, as their artists originally intended, as a way of letting visitors have the full effect of these multi-part works of art. They do not re-tell familiar stories, but invite the viewer to explore the underlying unity of the set.

Josef Albers
Formulation: Articulation, Folio II / Folder 5, 1972
screenprint
sheet: 15 x 40 in. (38.1 x 101.6 cm)

2017 Butte, Montana

Josef Albers—Formulate: Articulate showcases prints from Albers's portfolio Formulation: Articulation, highlighting signature works from over forty years of Albers's career. The exhibition is presented in conjunction with the Butte Light and Color Festival.

Josef Albers
Homage to the Square, Moonstone, 1962
oil on masonite
30 x 30 in. (76.2 x 76.2 cm)

2017 Glen Falls, New York

To Distribute and Multiply: The Feibes and Schmitt Gift is the inaugural exhibition celebrating the new Feibes and Schmitt Gallery at the museum. The collection features major works of modern and contemporary art by artists such as Josef Albers, Ellsworth Kelly, Sol Lewitt, Louise Nevelson, Bridget Riley, and Andy Warhol, among others.

Josef Albers
Full, 1962
from the portfolio Homage to the Square: Ten Works by Josef Albers
screenprint
sheet: 16 1/2 x 16 1/2 in. (41.9 x 41.9 cm)

2017 Birmingham, Alabama

Homage to the Square: Ten Works by Josef Albers features a set of ten screen prints by the artist from 1962. Each print is poetically titled, encouraging visitors to make connections between the meaning behind the titles and the experience viewing the prints. Albers is best known for the hundreds of paintings and prints from his series Homage to the Square, which explores the interaction of colors within a composition of three or four nested squares.

Anni Albers, Mexico City, Mexico, 1936
photograph by Josef Albers
photographic negative
Anni Albers
Floating, 1980
photo offset
17 7/8 x 16 1/2 in. (45.4 x 41.9 cm)
1994.11.61
Anni Albers
Do I, 1973
screenprint
25 5/8 x 25 5/8 in. (65.1 x 65.1 cm)
1994.11.26
Anni Albers
Double Impression IV, 1978
photo offset print
sheet: 11 x 9 in. (27.9 x 22.8 cm)

2017 Milan

Anni Albers: The Prints focuses on works on paper by the artist, including lithographs, engravings, and silkscreen and other prints on paper from 1969 to 1978, as well as archival photographs of the artist. In the 1960s, Albers developed graphic techniques in printmaking—taking advantage of the processes of the medium and the mediation of machines—that were impossible in weaving. These prints were a celebration of the possibilities of her new realm. In her pivotal 1965 book "On Weaving" Albers wrote: "The more we avoid standing in the way of the material and in the way of tools and machines, the better chance we have that our work will not be dated, will not bear the stamp of too limited a period of time and be old fashioned some day . . . and it will outlast fashion only if it embodies lasting, together with transitory, qualities."