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SEPTEMBER 10 "Anni Albers: Notebook 1970-1980" has won the 50 Books/50 Covers of 2017

AUGUST 24 Thread is selected as one of Time Magazine's "The World's Greatest Places"

JUNE 16 New book "Josef Albers: Interaction" is now available

MAY 18 "Schablonenschrift" in the Times Literary Supplement

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Anni Albers: Notebook 1970–1980 has won the 50 Books/50 Covers of 2017 award from the American Institute of Graphic Arts

"Anni Albers: Notebook 1970-1980" has won the 50 Books/50 Covers of 2017

Anni Albers: Notebook 1970–1980 has won the 50 Books/50 Covers of 2017 award from the American Institute of Graphic Arts. Each year, a panel of judges at the AIGA Design Archives reviews and awards the best of book and cover designs published within the past year for its long-standing Fifty Books of the Year competition. Anni Albers: Notebook was selected from a body of over eight hundred designs from more than forty countries. The book was published by David Zwirner Books, designed by Sarah Schrauwen, and printed at VeronaLibri, Verona. It has also been shortlisted for the 2018 British Book Design and Production Awards.

Thread Senegal is one of Time magazine's "The World's Greatest Places." Photo: Thatcher Hullerman Cook

Thread is selected as one of Time Magazine's "The World's Greatest Places"

Thread, the artists' residency and cultural center in Sinthian created by the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation and Le Korsa, and designed by Toshiko Mori Architect, has been selected as one of Time magazine's "The World's Greatest Places."

This is Time's first annual list of 100 destinations that are breaking new ground, leading industry trends, and offering visitors an extraordinary experience. To create the list, Time solicited nominations across a variety of categories—including museums, parks, restaurants and hotels—from editors and correspondents around the world, as well as dozens of industry experts. Time evaluated each one based on several key factors, including quality, originality, innovation, sustainability and influence. The result is a list as diverse as the world it reflects, with entries spanning six continents and forty-eight countries.

For the full story, visit http://time.com/collection/worlds-greatest-places-2018

Josef Albers: Interaction is available from Yale University Press

New book "Josef Albers: Interaction" is now available

Josef Albers: Interaction is a generously illustrated overview of Albers's work, accompanying the major exhibition in Essen, Germany. Beginning with Albers's time at the Bauhaus in Weimar and Dessau, the publication follows the artist to America and describes major themes of his work there as well as the importance of his frequent travels to Mexico. Paintings, prints, furniture, household objects, works in glass, photographs, and pre-Columbian sculptures are beautifully reproduced and discussed by a team of experts. The juxtaposition of Renaissance sculptures and icons with paintings by Albers underlines the intellectual and spiritual dimensions of his art, and Albers's influence on 1960s Minimalist art is also explored. Available from Yale University Press.

Josef Albers, Schablonenschrift, 1926. Reproduced in the magazine Offset: Buch und Werbekunst, No. 7

"Schablonenschrift" in the Times Literary Supplement

The Times Literary Supplement published an image without attribution of Josef Albers's Schablonenschrift in the May 2, 2018, article "Thin as a bubble: Why typefaces can be more beautiful—and interesting—than you might think." Nicholas Fox Weber's letter to the editor was published on May 18, 2018.

Sir,—In the issue of March 2 (p3), a unique and stunning typeface design was reproduced without identification. It is Josef Albers's 1926 Schablonenschrift. Albers, who was then at the Bauhaus as a teacher, was fascinated by typography. He created this entire alphabet—the one shown in the TLS—with each letter composed of circles or squares or parts thereof, a deliberately minimal vocabulary of form. The version of his lettering that is shown was initially reproduced in the magazine Offset: Buch und Werbekunst, No. 7, in the same year that he created it. But when I knew Josef in the 1970s, he was still fine-tuning the lettering, insisting he had never got the "z" right. Its clarity was essential to him, as was its rhythm. At the age of eight-five, he finally achieved a "z" that satisfied him.

—Nicholas Fox Weber, Executive Director of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation